This Weekend: Kiku Takes Root at NYBG

Author: admin  //  Category: landscaping ideas

Kiku The Art of the Japanese GardenThe first weekend of Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden begins tomorrow, and to celebrate we have a full schedule of special programs. Come admire hundreds of meticulously trained kiku in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory and attend our special Kiku Poetry Reading with Chase Twichell; view demonstrations of Ikebana: The Art of Japanese Flower Arranging; and enjoying a delicious meal at our Japanese Pop-Up Restaurant. There are many ways to immerse yourself in the beautiful traditions of Japanese gardens.

At the same time, The Haunted Pumpkin Garden is continuing to fill the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden with spooky seasonal fun for the whole family. This weekend includes Halloween Parades and the chance to meet the Creepy Critters of Halloween! Read on for the full schedule of programs and events this weekend for Kiku and The Haunted Pumpkin Garden—as well as a special tour covering the History of NYBG!

Saturday, October 4
Kiky Japanese chrysanthemum

Kiku Roaming Guides — 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
In the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory
Get an in-depth look into the world of kiku with guides stationed throughout the exhibition.

Bird Walk – 11 a.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
The diverse habitats of the Botanical Garden offer visitors a chance to see dozens of species of birds throughout the year. Bring your binoculars and walk the Garden grounds with an expert to learn about bird-friendly habitats, migrating species, and birds that make a permanent home at the Garden.

Ikebana Weekend: The Art of Japanese Flower Arranging — 12–4 p.m.
In the Conservatory Courtyard
Japanese ikebana—“flowers kept alive”—is a complex form of asymmetrical flower arranging. Join expert-led demonstrations of this timeless and elegant art and sign up for an Adult Education class on the subject.

About the artists:
Angelita Castro started studying ikebana in Brazil in 1989. She later studied in Japan, receiving her Ikebana instructor Level I, II, and III certifications. She has participated in ikebana exhibitions throughout the nation, and is also a volunteer and teacher at Izunome Association, the Sangetsu Coordinator of Activities for the East Coast, and a member of the Ikebana International Washington Chapter.

Miho Negrao studied ikebana in Atami, Japan, where she received her Level I instructor certification in 1993. She is an active member of the Ikebana Sangetsu School of Flower Arranging and has conducted ikebana demonstrations at Berkeley University, the Red Cross New York Chapter, and the West Village Elementary School.

The Ikebana Sangetsu School of Flower Arranging was established on June 15, 1972, by Itsuki Okada, based on a series of color photographs of Mokichi Okada arrangements. The name Sangetsu—”Moon over Mountain”—was chosen by Okada, in memory of his beloved teahouse, known as Sangetsu Pavilion. Okada would visit his teahouse every day, arranging flowers in the alcove and inviting guests to share in the tea ceremony with him. Okada’s style expresses simplicity and naturalness, allowing the inner spirit of the flowers to guide the student.

Creepy Creatures of Halloween–12 2 p.m.
Part of The Haunted Pumpkin Garden
At the Clay Family Picnic Pavilions
Some of the animals that make us scream are actually the coolest animals around. Meet some new critters from our big backyard and beyond during this live presentation and discover the unique adaptations that help them survive in their habitats.
A selection of featured creatures (may vary each weekend) includes:

  • Native NYBG reptiles (such as our snapping turtles!)
  • Dwarf Caiman
  • Large Albino Python or Boa Constrictor
  • Tegu Lizards
  • Small snakes
  • Sulcatta Tortoise
  • Panther Chameleon

About the presenting organization:
New York Wild! was created to give urban NYC residents more opportunities to experience nature up close. Erik Zeidler, founder of New York Wild!, has a lifelong passion for wildlife and nature, especially reptiles. This is an interest he has been pursuing since he was four years old while growing up in the Bronx, a seemingly unlikely setting for a naturalist. His company brings opportunities to the youth of New York City so that they too can be involved with wildlife. His programs have a profound impact and have changed the way many people feel about snakes and other misunderstood animals.

History of NYBG Tour — 12:30 2:30
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet one of the Garden’s guides for a tour of historically significant sites within the Garden’s 250 acres.

Taiko Drumming — 1 3 p.m.
Thunderous and thrilling, the taiko (Japanese drum) has been called “the voice and spirit of the Japanese people.” From its roots in agriculture and use in the ancient music in shrines and temples, traditional taiko folk music is believed to have entertained the gods, attracted good fortune, driven away evil forces and insects, lent strength and courage to warriors, and celebrated life. Join in the celebration with the skilled drummers from Taiko Masala.

About Taiko Masala
Taiko Masala has thrilled audiences throughout the U.S. with performances of Japan’s traditional drumming—taiko—combining the training and discipline of Japanese martial arts with the precision and power of complex percussion. Their arsenal of instruments, all handmade by the ensemble, range from small eight-inch, hand-held drums to five foot barrel drums, and features the giant 250-pound O-daiko.

Poetry for Every Season: Kiku Poetry Reading — 4 p.m.
In the Ross Hall
Celebrate the beauty of fall flowers and foliage and their significance in Japanese culture with poet Chase Twichell, who will read classic favorites as well as a selection from her own work. Seating is limited; reserve your tickets in advance to guarantee seating. Get your tickets here and select the special All-Garden Pass titled “Poetry for Every Season Reading: Kiku.”

About The Artist
Chase Twichell is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently Horses Where the Answers Should Have Been: New Selected Poems (Copper Canyon, 2010), which won both the Kingsley Tufts Award and the Balcones Poetry Prize. After teaching for many years, most recently at Princeton University, she resigned in order to start Ausable Press, an independent publisher of poetry, which she ran until 2009, when it was acquired by Copper Canyon Press. She and her husband, the novelist Russell Banks, split their time between the Adirondacks in upstate New York, and Miami Beach.

Sunday, October 5
Kiky Japanese chrysanthemum

Kiku Roaming Guides — 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
In the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory
Get an in-depth look into the world of kiku with guides stationed throughout the exhibition.

Bird Walk – 11 a.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
The diverse habitats of the Botanical Garden offer visitors a chance to see dozens of species of birds throughout the year. Bring your binoculars and walk the Garden grounds with an expert to learn about bird-friendly habitats, migrating species, and birds that make a permanent home at the Garden.

Ikebana Weekend: The Art of Japanese Flower Arranging — 12–4 p.m.
In the Conservatory Courtyard
Japanese ikebana—“flowers kept alive”—is a complex form of asymmetrical flower arranging. Join expert-led demonstrations of this timeless and elegant art and sign up for an Adult Education class on the subject.

About the artists:
Angelita Castro started studying ikebana in Brazil in 1989. She later studied in Japan, receiving her Ikebana instructor Level I, II, and III certifications. She has participated in ikebana exhibitions throughout the nation, and is also a volunteer and teacher at Izunome Association, the Sangetsu Coordinator of Activities for the East Coast, and a member of the Ikebana International Washington Chapter.

Miho Negrao studied ikebana in Atami, Japan, where she received her Level I instructor certification in 1993. She is an active member of the Ikebana Sangetsu School of Flower Arranging and has conducted ikebana demonstrations at Berkeley University, the Red Cross New York Chapter, and the West Village Elementary School.

The Ikebana Sangetsu School of Flower Arranging was established on June 15, 1972, by Itsuki Okada, based on a series of color photographs of Mokichi Okada arrangements. The name Sangetsu—”Moon over Mountain”—was chosen by Okada, in memory of his beloved teahouse, known as Sangetsu Pavilion. Okada would visit his teahouse every day, arranging flowers in the alcove and inviting guests to share in the tea ceremony with him. Okada’s style expresses simplicity and naturalness, allowing the inner spirit of the flowers to guide the student.

Creepy Creatures of Halloween–12 2 p.m.
Part of The Haunted Pumpkin Garden
At the Clay Family Picnic Pavilions
Some of the animals that make us scream are actually the coolest animals around. Meet some new critters from our big backyard and beyond during this live presentation and discover the unique adaptations that help them survive in their habitats.
A selection of featured creatures (may vary each weekend) includes:

  • Native NYBG reptiles (such as our snapping turtles!)
  • Dwarf Caiman
  • Large Albino Python or Boa Constrictor
  • Tegu Lizards
  • Small snakes
  • Sulcatta Tortoise
  • Panther Chameleon

About the presenting organization:
New York Wild! was created to give urban NYC residents more opportunities to experience nature up close. Erik Zeidler, founder of New York Wild!, has a lifelong passion for wildlife and nature, especially reptiles. This is an interest he has been pursuing since he was four years old while growing up in the Bronx, a seemingly unlikely setting for a naturalist. His company brings opportunities to the youth of New York City so that they too can be involved with wildlife. His programs have a profound impact and have changed the way many people feel about snakes and other misunderstood animals.

Forest Tour – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Experience the beauty of the Garden’s 50-acre Thain Family Forest on this one-hour walking tour with an expertly trained Guide. You’ll learn facts about the trees, history, geology, and ecology of this original, uncut woodland.

Taiko Drumming — 1 3 p.m.
Thunderous and thrilling, the taiko (Japanese drum) has been called “the voice and spirit of the Japanese people.” From its roots in agriculture and use in the ancient music in shrines and temples, traditional taiko folk music is believed to have entertained the gods, attracted good fortune, driven away evil forces and insects, lent strength and courage to warriors, and celebrated life. Join in the celebration with the skilled drummers from Taiko Masala.

About Taiko Masala
Taiko Masala has thrilled audiences throughout the U.S. with performances of Japan’s traditional drumming—taiko—combining the training and discipline of Japanese martial arts with the precision and power of complex percussion. Their arsenal of instruments, all handmade by the ensemble, range from small eight-inch, hand-held drums to five foot barrel drums, and features the giant 250-pound O-daiko.

Perennial Garden Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Join a Garden Guide for a tour of the Jane Watson Irwin Perennial Garden, which combines a vast palette of colors, textures, flowers, and foliage to create interest in every season.

Ongoing Children’s Programs
The Haunted Pumpkin Garden NYBG

Family Adventures: The Haunted Pumpkin Garden – 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
In the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden
The Haunted Pumpkin Garden returns to its roots with a massive display of pumpkins and gourds from North America, ranging from the unusual to the gargantuan. Thousands of specimens will create a unique and fascinating backdrop to the slate of Halloween activities in the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden. Every day kids can play inside the Pumpkin House, put on a scary show at the Pumpkin Puppet Theater, look for wiggly worms under a rotting log, and plant a pumpkin seed to take home, while each weekend offers parades and even more treats.

  • Put on your own performance in the Pumpkin Puppet Theater.
  • Play inside the Pumpkin House.
  • Watch a pumpkin seed sprout.
  • Go on a scavenger hunt.
  • Join a Halloween Parade at 1 or 3 p.m.

Dig, Plant, Grow: Goodnight, Garden
In the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden
Join us as we prepare the garden for the change in seasons. Plant a cover crop, bury bulbs before the frost, and grab a rake to gather all of the fallen leaves.

Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens – 1:30 p.m. – 6 p.m.
In the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden
Kids can explore with Mario’s Menu Mystery game, featuring favorite vegetables and herbs from nine of his restaurants’ kitchens, including Otto and Del Posto.

Cooking Demonstrations – 2 4 p.m.
At the Whole Foods Market® Family Garden Kitchen
From late spring into early fall, learn to cook up flavorful new recipes using garden-fresh ingredients, twice a day on Wednesdays and weekends in the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden. Sponsored by Whole Foods market and Viking

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