Green Invaders: What You Can Do

Joyce H. Newman holds a Certificate in Horticulture from The New York Botanical Garden and has been a Tour Guide for over seven years. She is a blogger for Garden Variety News and the former editor of Consumer Reports GreenerChoices.org.


NYS InvasivesFall is a good time to identify many of the common invasive plants and wildlife that may be threatening your garden. While you’re cleaning up your leaves and garden beds, you can spot the invaders including mile-a-minute vine, multiflora rose, Norway maple, oriental bittersweet, phragmites, porcelain berry,  Tree of Heaven, winged euonymus, and more.

Many of these exotic species were intentionally introduced from other countries more than a century ago. Some were used as packing material, while others just took a ride on ships from Asia and Europe. Some plants were cultivated for their ornamental value without regard for the fact that they could out-compete important native species. A detailed list of prohibited and regulated invasive plants in New York State with pictures is provided here.

You can learn to identify some of these invasive plants right in your own backyard and then report your findings by signing up on a new smartphone app, online database, and website called iMapInvasives.

The site is designed with different layers so that gardeners and homeowners as well as scientists and natural resource specialists can use it. All users can sign up for email alerts and produce invasive species lists for specific geographical areas, by zip code, town, county, or region.

The idea behind the site is to map the areas where invasive plants and wildlife are located so that we can stop them in their tracks. The GIS-based data management system lets you use an interactive website or smartphone to identify invasive plants.

Various types of data are available in iMapInvasives: basic information about the species along with information about treatment, infestation, and area surveyed. Once you register—there are separate pages for each state—you will receive an email with information and a login. For New York State, the web address is: nyimapinvasives.org.

Training is also available to help use the site, depending on your level of interest.

Photos courtesy imapinvasives.org

 

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/10/tip-of-the-week/green-invaders-what-you-can-do/

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Morning Eye Candy: Seeing Red

Don’t get frustrated, the long wait is over and fall foliage has arrived at NYBG!

Native Plant Garden Fall Foliage

In the Native Plant Garden – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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This Weekend: Kiku’s Last Weekend & Giant Pumpkins Galore

Kiku The Art of the Japanese Garden ozukuriThis Sunday is the last day of Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden, so don’t miss your chance to see hundreds of chrysanthemum blossoms take over the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory in a variety of contemporary and traditional Japanese designs. While you’re here, enjoy our Japanese Pop-Up Restaurant in its final days of serving up delicious Japanese cuisine.

October 25 and 26 is also our Award-Winning Giant Pumpkin Display. We have the largest pumpkins in North America, plus Ray Villafane’s  massive zombie carving, all here for family photo ops. This weekend is also the The Haunted Pumpkin Garden‘s last before it departs for another year on October 31. Now is the time to bring the family to check out Creepy Creatures of Halloween, Spooky Nighttime Adventures, Budding Masters Creepy Pumpkin Carving Adventures (exclusively for MasterCard cardholders), and other weekend activities that will say goodbye this weekend.

In case you’re still on the fence about this weekend’s Spooky Nighttime Adventure, last week’s completely sold out, so don’t wait too long to grab your tickets!

Read on for the full schedule of special programs, and plan your visit to admire some of the largest plant displays you’ll ever see!


Saturday, October 25
The Haunted Pumpkin Garden

Roaming Guides – 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
In the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory
Get an in-depth look into the world of Kiku with guides stationed throughout the exhibition.

Bonsai Weekend- 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. (Demonstrations at 12 2 p.m.)
Part of Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden
In the Conservatory Courtyard
Beautifully crafted bonsai will be on display for one weekend only! Listen to Michael Pollock and other experts from the Yama Ki Bonsai Society as they share tips and tricks about miniaturizing mature shrubs and trees to create living sculptures

Bird Walk – 11 a.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
The diverse habitats of the Botanical Garden offer visitors a chance to see dozens of species of birds throughout the year. Bring your binoculars and walk the Garden grounds with an expert to learn about bird-friendly habitats, migrating species, and birds that make a permanent home at the Garden.

Creepy Creatures of Halloween–12 2 p.m.
Part of The Haunted Pumpkin Garden
At the Clay Family Picnic Pavilions
Some of the animals that make us scream are actually the coolest animals around. Meet some new critters from our big backyard and beyond during this live presentation and discover the unique adaptations that help them survive in their habitats.

Forest Tour – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Experience the beauty of the Garden’s 50-acre Thain Family Forest on this one-hour walking tour with an expertly trained Guide. You’ll learn facts about the trees, history, geology, and ecology of this original, uncut woodland.

Taiko Drumming — 1 3 p.m.
Thunderous and thrilling, the taiko (Japanese drum) has been called “the voice and spirit of the Japanese people.” From its roots in agriculture and use in the ancient music in shrines and temples, traditional taiko folk music is believed to have entertained the gods, attracted good fortune, driven away evil forces and insects, lent strength and courage to warriors, and celebrated life. Join in the celebration with the skilled drummers from Taiko Masala.

Perennial Garden Tour – 2:30p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Join a Garden Guide for a tour of the Jane Watson Irwin Perennial Garden, which combines a vast palette of colors, textures, flowers, and foliage to create interest in every season.

Spooky Nighttime Adventures – 6:30–8:30 p.m. (entry times at 6:30 7 p.m.)
Part of The Haunted Pumpkin Garden
Everett Children’s Adventure Garden
Now with more spooky fun! Grab a Con Edison flashlight and explore the exhibit as you travel along the Whole Foods Market® Trick-or-Treat Trail after dark. Listen for critters of the night or sit in on a spooky ghost story. Capture a family photo with larger-than-life skeletons and costumed characters. For those who dare, see the giant pumpkin displays illuminated in the darkness and journey along the meandering Mitsubishi Wild Wetland Trail.

Sunday, October 26
Kiku the Art of the Japanese Garden

Roaming Guides – 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
In the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory
Get an in-depth look into the world of Kiku with guides stationed throughout the exhibition.

Bonsai Weekend- 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. (Demonstrations at 12 2 p.m.)
Part of Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden
In the Conservatory Courtyard
Beautifully crafted bonsai will be on display for one weekend only! Listen to Michael Pollock and other experts from the Yama Ki Bonsai Society as they share tips and tricks about miniaturizing mature shrubs and trees to create living sculptures

Creepy Creatures of Halloween–12 2 p.m.
Part of The Haunted Pumpkin Garden
At the Clay Family Picnic Pavilions
Some of the animals that make us scream are actually the coolest animals around. Meet some new critters from our big backyard and beyond during this live presentation and discover the unique adaptations that help them survive in their habitats.

Native Plant Garden Tour – 12:30 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Join a tour guide for an insider’s view of the newly designed Native Plant Garden. Enjoy a mosaic of nearly 100,000 native trees, wildflowers, ferns and grasses designed to flourish in every season.

Taiko Drumming — 1 3 p.m.
Thunderous and thrilling, the taiko (Japanese drum) has been called “the voice and spirit of the Japanese people.” From its roots in agriculture and use in the ancient music in shrines and temples, traditional taiko folk music is believed to have entertained the gods, attracted good fortune, driven away evil forces and insects, lent strength and courage to warriors, and celebrated life. Join in the celebration with the skilled drummers from Taiko Masala.

Ongoing Children’s Programs
Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden

Family Adventures: The Haunted Pumpkin Garden – 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
In the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden
The Haunted Pumpkin Garden returns to its roots with a massive display of pumpkins and gourds from North America, ranging from the unusual to the gargantuan. Thousands of specimens will create a unique and fascinating backdrop to the slate of Halloween activities in the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden. Every day kids can play inside the Pumpkin House, put on a scary show at the Pumpkin Puppet Theater, look for wiggly worms under a rotting log, and plant a pumpkin seed to take home, while each weekend offers parades and even more treats. Bring your whole family to enjoy this exciting annual tradition at the Garden. This year, The Haunted Pumpkin Garden combines the spooky fun of Halloween festivities with an astonishing display of the most eye-catching and intriguing pumpkins and gourds. The largest pumpkins from North America will once again call the Garden home on October 25 26.

Dig, Plant, Grow: Goodnight, Garden – 1:30 – 6 p.m.
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden
Join us as we prepare the garden for the change in seasons. Plant a cover crop, bury bulbs before the frost, and grab a rake to gather all of the fallen leaves.

Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens – 1:30 p.m. – 6 p.m.
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden
Kids can explore with Mario’s Menu Mystery game, featuring favorite vegetables and herbs from nine of his restaurants’ kitchens, including Otto and Del Posto.

Cooking Demonstrations – 2 4 p.m.
At the Whole Foods Market® Family Garden Kitchen
From late spring into early fall, learn to cook up flavorful new recipes using garden-fresh ingredients, twice a day on Wednesdays and weekends in the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden.
Sponsored by Whole Foods Market and Viking

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/10/garden-programming/this-weekend-kikus-last-weekend-giant-pumpkins-galore/

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Mum’s The Word

Sonia Uyterhoeven is NYBG‘s Gardener for Public Education.


Chrysanthemum rubellum 'Sheffield'

Chrysanthemum rubellum ‘Sheffield’

We are heading into the final weekend of Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden. The show is awash with vivid autumnal color and exotic chrysanthemum blooms in every shape and size imaginable.

For those curious, there are 13 different classes of chrysanthemums. Some of my favorites are the Edo varieties which fall into the last class of mums—Class 13: Unclassified or Exotic. These are the chrysanthemum flower shapes that do not fit into any established category. They often have twisted, bi-color florets that change their shape as they open.

Beyond these, there are many fun and fanciful chrysanthemum flower forms to cover. Chrysanthemums from the Brush and Thistle class look like an artist’s paint brush. Spider mums look like fireworks exploding in the sky. They have long, tubular ray florets that hook or coil at the end. Anemone-type mums have centers that are raised up like a pincushion, and chrysanthemums from the Spoon class have long ray florets with tips that are shaped as their name suggests.

Chrysanthemum rubellum ‘Sheffield Pink’

Chrysanthemum rubellum ‘Sheffield Pink’

The exhibition mums take from 9–12 months to grow. They are fed, pinched, and laboriously trained into ornate shapes. The showiest display is Ozukuri or “Thousand Bloom.” From one small cutting, the mum is trained into five main branches that are repeatedly pinched to form an intricate framework of flowers. Kengai or “Cascade” is trained in a fishbone pattern to cover a large panel. After 10 months, the frame is tilted downwards to form a flowing cascade.

While the exhibition mums are fragile and require an enormous amount of care, homeowners can have their fall chrysanthemum color without all the hassle. Granted, they will not be trained to perfection or come in all the exotic flower forms mentioned here—unless that happens to be your expertise!

Belgian mums are readily available on the market these days for the casual mum gardener. They are hardy provided they are planted in September and given enough time to establish a solid root system. These mums are no-pinch and are flexible enough that they do not break easily. Varieties of these mums are categorized by flowering time: very early, early, mid, and late. You can extend your flowering season from early September until early November by selecting mums from different flowering categories.

This year in the Garden we have planted one of my favorite mums, Chrysanthemum rubellum ‘Sheffield Pink’. It is another hardy chrysanthemum that looks more like Korean mums than the ubiquitous florist or Belgian mums. These mums reach 2–3 feet tall and spread to form an open, loose clump. They often require staking and it is a good idea to pinch these mums back once or twice earlier in the season (late May into June), or to cut them back by half in early June.

Chrysanthemum rubellum ‘Sheffield Yellow’

Chrysanthemum rubellum ‘Sheffield Yellow’

This year in our container displays we have ‘Sheffield’, ‘Sheffield Pink’, and ‘Sheffield Yellow’ planted. ‘Sheffield’ opens up apricot and takes on pink overtones as it matures; ‘Sheffield Pink’ is a baby pink that has a small white halo around its yellow eye; and ‘Sheffield Yellow’ is a cheerful yellow with apricot and gold buds.

Mums like full sun to partial shade. They thrive in rich, well-drained soil. Add compost or organic matter when you plant. If you are pinching your mums, it is best to pinch before July 4th, otherwise they will flower too late in the season. Wait until spring to cut back your mums or at least leave several inches for winter protection and lightly mulch around them if they are planted in an exposed site.

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Morning Eye Candy: Glittering Glasshouse

The Enid A. Haupt Conservatory catches the morning light beautifully.

Enid A. Haupt Conservatory
The Enid A. Haupt Conservatory – Photo by Ivo M. Vemeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/10/photography/morning-eye-candy-glittering-glasshouse/

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Inside Ray Villafane’s Apocalyptic Zombie Carving

Ray Villafane Zombie carving The Haunted Pumpkin GardenLast weekend was our Pumpkin Carving Weekend with Ray Villafane, and the Master Carver himself executed a massive pumpkin sculpture, after his own design, with the help of his crack team. The fruits—or gourds—of his labor are on display through October 31 as part of The Haunted Pumpkin Garden.

In case you missed the opportunity to see Ray’s zombie carving come to life, we have a video with Ray himself taking you through the process of carving his pumpkin sculpture for NYBG. The end result is a bone-chilling zombie climbing out of a 1700-pound pumpkin! Check out the installation this weekend as part of our annual Award-Winning Giant Pumpkin Display, or for the full Halloween experience get tickets to one of our upcoming Spooky Nighttime Adventures and see Ray’s creation fully illuminated for the first time in his four years working with the Garden.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/10/video/inside-ray-villafanes-apocalyptic-zombie-carving/

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Morning Eye Candy: One By One

We’re approaching peak color in the next few weeks! Check our Foliage Tracker to make sure you catch the leaves at their most vibrant.

fall foliage NYBG

In the Thain Family Forest – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Morning Eye Candy: Tree of Life

Ross Conifer Arboretum

European hornbeam (Carpinus betulus ‘Fastigiata’) in the Ross Conifer Arboretum – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/10/photography/morning-eye-candy-tree-of-life/

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Leaf Propagation: A Succulent Shared

Christian Primeau is the NYBG‘s Manager of the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory.


Nolen Greenhouses gardener Karen Drews takes leaf cuttings

Nolen Greenhouses gardener Karen Drews takes leaf cuttings

Who doesn’t love a sharer? Not an over-sharer, like Harold in Accounting, whose detailed inquest into his latest digestive afflictions has positively ruined my lunch hour three days running (I’m a horticulturist, not a doctor, Harold…we’ve been over this). No, I’m referring to the sweet woman who makes popcorn and secretly gifts you a handful, or the savior who brings coffee for everyone on Monday morning. And while you won’t even get within visual range of any popcorn or coffee in my possession, I am a prolific sharer of plants, so I do have a few friends left about the office.

Propagating plants can be as painless and satisfying as popping corn, pressing “brew” on the coffee machine, or simply eating lunch outside under a shady tree to avoid Harold. This is especially true of rosette succulents like Echeveria. Often referred to as Mexican Hens and Chicks, these Central and South American species adore sun, tolerate neglect, and exhibit a vast array of captivating leaf forms as well as flower and foliage colors. Truth be told, it’s a painfully easy group of plants to become enamored with and collect. The good news is that propagating and sharing your echeverias is a great way to make someone’s day and assuage the guilt of having spent far too much money on internet plant auctions. Be sure to remind your very patient and understanding spouse that smiles are priceless. PRICELESS.

Planted leaf cuttings

Planted leaf cuttings

Luckily, one Echeveria can yield a bounty of babies (and therefore smiles!) A word of warning, however: the first act involves courage as it entails “decimating” your lovely plant by gently detaching each mature leaf from the stem. Fear not—every thick, succulent leaf is a self-contained “power pack” with the ability to continue photosynthesizing and enough stored moisture to put that energy to immediate use growing new roots and leaves.

The second step is no more challenging. Simply lay each leaf directly on the surface of a moistened, well-drained cactus/succulent soil mix, or bury the detached end of each leaf in the medium at a 45-degree angle, tamping lightly around the base to secure it firmly in position. Place your leaf cuttings in bright, indirect light in a warm, well ventilated area.

Succulent leaf cuttings show the beginnings of new rosettes.

Succulent leaf cuttings show the beginnings of new rosettes.

For the next four to five weeks you’ll play the waiting game. If you keep the mix ever so slightly moist during that time, you will experience what I find to be one of the most rewarding aspects of horticulture. From the base of each leaf will emerge delicate young roots followed by one or more miniature new rosettes. These rosettes will grow and strengthen, absorbing moisture and nutrients in the soil as well as the still-attached “mother leaf.”

When the original leaf begins to yellow and shrivel, you can carefully transplant each new rosette into its own little pot. You are now poised to shower your friends and coworkers with leafy love. Yes…even Harold.

I encourage you to experiment with this simple propagation technique. Remember, it works just as well on Graptopetalum, Sedum, Kalanchoe, and many other succulent plant species. Have fun! Share! Go forth and multiply your plants!

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/10/horticulture-2/leaf-propagation-a-succulent-shared/

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Morning Eye Candy: One By One

We’re approaching peak color in the next few weeks! Check our Foliage Tracker to make sure you catch the leaves at their most vibrant.

fall foliage NYBG

In the Thain Family Forest – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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