Morning Eye Candy: Regal

A somewhat more rarefied visitor to the Garden grounds than our Red-tailed Hawks, Pat tells us the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden and the surrounding Wetlands are often good spots to see these regal raptors.

Cooper's Hawk

A Cooper’s Hawk in the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden – Photo by Patricia Gonzalez

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2015/02/photography/morning-eye-candy-regal/

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This Weekend: The Orchid Show Revealed!

The NYBG WeekendWe’re at the tail end of one of the coldest Februaries on record, the snow pack on our lawns is thick enough to keep the plants nicely insulated, and you can visit the equator by setting foot in our Haupt Conservatory. One of those things is not like the other—I know. But this Saturday marks the public opening of The Orchid Show for 2015, and it could not be more tropical in there. It’s plenty warm, the humidity’s up (especially compared to what you’re dealing with in your city apartment, I imagine), and everyone is welcome to join us for some much-needed color and life.

There’ll be plenty of additional events and activities open to you when you stop by, too, including tours, orchid care demonstrations for greenthumbs new and old, dance lessons, and fun for kids. Head below for our full weekend schedule, but before you do, check out our first “making of” video of 2015 for The Orchid Show, where Anna Toledano explains the motivations behind this year’s aerially-inspired flower theme.


Saturday, February 28

The NYBG Weekend

Roaming Guides — 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
In the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory
Garden guides highlight parts of the permanent collection and special exhibition to add insight to your experience of The Orchid Show. They will provide an in-depth look at rare and extraordinary orchid specimens on display.

Bird Walk — 11 a.m.
Meet by the Reflecting Pool
Bring your binoculars and tour the grounds with a National Audubon Society member to encounter and learn about the birds that call the Garden home.

Ballroom’s Best: Tango, Waltz, and Cha-Cha — 1 3 p.m.
In Ross Hall
Dancers from Ballet Hispanico’s BHdos troupe lead audiences through dances such as the waltz, tango, mambo, and cha-cha are gorgeously costumed and choreographed. A guided instruction gives you insights on how to master the moves yourself.

Orchid Expert QA — 1:30–4:30 p.m.
In Shop in the Garden
Drop in and ask about orchid care tips. Plants in need of care will be available as testers so that you can learn how to repot and replant.

Orchid Care Demonstration: Know and Grow Orchids — 2 3 p.m.
In the Conservatory Greenschool
Join Sonia Uyterhoeven, Gardener for Public Education, as she discusses the basics of orchid care and how to choose and successfully grow these exotic plants.


Sunday, March 1

The NYBG Weekend

Roaming Guides — 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
In the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory
Garden guides highlight parts of the permanent collection and special exhibition to add insight to your experience of The Orchid Show. They will provide an in-depth look at rare and extraordinary orchid specimens on display.

Ballroom’s Best: Tango, Waltz, and Cha-Cha — 1 3 p.m.
In Ross Hall
Dancers from Ballet Hispanico’s BHdos troupe lead audiences through dances such as the waltz, tango, mambo, and cha-cha are gorgeously costumed and choreographed. A guided instruction gives you insights on how to master the moves yourself.

Orchid Expert QA — 1:30–4:30 p.m.
In Shop in the Garden
Drop in and ask about orchid care tips. Plants in need of care will be available as testers so that you can learn how to repot and replant.

Orchid Care Demonstration: Know and Grow Orchids — 2 3 p.m.
In the Conservatory Greenschool
Join Sonia Uyterhoeven, Gardener for Public Education, as she discusses the basics of orchid care and how to choose and successfully grow these exotic plants.


Ongoing Children’s Programs

The NYBG Weekend

Little Landscapes
In the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden
Through April 19, Tuesdays–Fridays, 1:30–5:30 p.m.; Saturdays Sundays, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Pot up a desert plant inside a terrarium container and craft a figurine to inhabit your tiny world. Compare your habitat to terrarium displays in the Discovery Center and explore our life-size terrarium—the Bendheim Global Greenhouse.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2015/02/garden-programming/this-weekend-the-orchid-show-revealed/

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Wild Medicine Photo Contest Winners: Week 4

The Orchid Show Candeliers Haupt Conservatory Wild Medicine Photo Contest NYBGWhile the exhibit may have ended last Sunday to make way for the forthcoming Orchid Show, this year’s Wild Medicine Photo Contest collected its final round of submissions this past week. We are pleased to announce here on Plant Talk the fourth and final round of weekly winners! Photos uploaded to the NYBG Flickr Group Pool are no longer being accepted for consideration.

Two of the talented photographers previously recognized over the past four weeks will be chosen as our Grand Prize winners—one in the Macro category and another for Sense of Place. The Grand Prize is a free seat in the Adult Education Photography class of their choice. Click through to admire the latest round of beautiful qualifying photos!

 


Macro

#wildmedicine by Enrie Morales Wild Medicine Photo Contest

“#wildmedicine” by Enrie Morales

 

 


IMGP1326 Peter Moore Flickr Wild Medicine Photo Contest

“IMGP1326″ by Peter Moore

 


Susan B. Naumann Flickr Wild Medicine Photo Contest

“HOYA, II” ® Susan B. Naumann


Sense of Place

NYBG'S GLASS CEILING Susan B Naumann Enid Haupt Conservatory Wild Medicine Photo Contest

NYBG’S GLASS CEILING © Susan B Naumann

 


Wild Medicine Photo Contest Flickr Susan B. Naumann

“#wildmedicine” © Susan B. Naumann

 


 

Enrie Morales Wild Medicine Photo Contest Flickr Enrie Morales

“#wildmedicine” by Enrie Morales


Check back soon to see who wins the Grand Prize!

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2015/02/photography/wild-medicine-photo-contest-winners-week-4/

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Morning Eye Candy: Tower of Flower Power

The Orchid Show
Part of The Orchid Show: Chandeliers in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory – Photo b Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Dancing Ladies

Sonia Uyterhoeven is NYBG‘s Gardener for Public Education.


Oncidium Sharry Baby 'Red Fantasy'

Oncidium Sharry Baby ‘Red Fantasy’

If you are looking for a forgiving orchid, dancing ladies—or Oncidium—are a good choice for homeowners with decent light. Oncidiums are a species with panache—the dancing ladies have a lower lip or labellum which flares out like an opulent hoop skirt. Their sepals and petals are diminutive in contrast and look like the head and outstretched arms of little ladies. These lovely blossoms perch in profusion on long, branched flower stalks which bob and sway in a gentle breeze.

These lovely ladies use their good looks to their advantage; they are promiscuous and will be happy to hybridize with just about anyone. They hybridize well with Brassia, Miltonia, Odontoglossum, and many more species to create hybrids and complex hybrids that combine the best of both or multiple parents. The Oncidium Alliance is large with many vibrant orchids that are not only stunning, but also easy to care for.

Oncidiums are a diverse New World genus with species that range from warmth-loving orchids found growing at sea level to species that appreciate cooler climates, growing high in the Andes. Dancing ladies like moderately bright to bright indirect light. In your home, an east-, south-, or west-facing window will work. Thicker-leaved Oncidiums can tolerate more light.

Dancing ladies are intermediate to warm growers. In terms of orchid care, the temperature range refers to nighttime temperatures. The majority of these orchids will be happy if the nighttime temperature in your home is 55 to 65° Fahrenheit. Daytime temperature is ideal between 70 and 85°, but will obviously be influenced by seasonal factors. Oncidiums can tolerate higher temperatures if the humidity is high, but temperature is a crucial factor in flowering and they will flower best if nighttime temperatures drop below 65° Fahrenheit.

Humidity is best kept around 30–60%. Often, placing orchids on top of gravel-filled humidity trays is an effective method of raising humidity in the immediate area; clustering plants together also works well. Pot up your Oncidium in a fine to medium bark mix in either a plastic or clay pot. They don’t mind being snug in their homes, so reach for a smaller pot when possible. When re-potting, allow space for one to two years’ growth.

Oncidium Tiger Crow 'Golden Girl'

Oncidium Tiger Crow ‘Golden Girl’

When watering, remember that these orchids have large, swollen pseudobulbs that act as water storage systems. Oncidiums like to approach dryness before they receive more water. Orchids with large, fleshy roots and thick leaves need less water than thin-rooted, thin-leaved species. Give the pot a good soak when watering and then allow the pot to start drying out—down to an inch.

Fertilize every two weeks when your orchid is actively growing and cut back on fertilizer and water when light and temperature change in the winter. Some Oncidium leaves have a tendency to develop tiny, dark-brown/black spots if they come in contact with cold water. This is nothing to worry about and is simply cosmetic.

Dancing ladies love to flower; they will bloom for four to eight weeks at a time. Many of the hybrids will even repeat bloom. They come in a variety of colors but are best known for their flamboyant yellows or multi-colored pink, white, and brown combinations.

Many of the brilliant yellow hybrids come from Oncidium varicosum, Oncidium tigrinum, or Oncidium flexuosum. The hybrids have variations in flowering frequency, size, shape, and color. Among them, popular hybrids include ‘Sweet Sugar’, Jiuhbao Gold ‘Tainan’, and ‘Gower Ramsey’. Whichever one you choose, you cannot go wrong.

I would be remiss, however, if I did not mention that some Oncidiums are marvelously fragrant. They have the ability to whet the appetite of even the most stoic orchid aficionado. Some Oncidiums have yummy fragrances that are reminiscent of vanilla, chocolate, or even Hawaiian Punch.

Oncidium Jiuhbao Gold

Oncidium Jiuhbao Gold

These orchids share the parentage of what was formerly Oncidium ornithorhynchum and has now been changed to Oncidium sotoanum. Her most famous progeny is Oncidium ‘Sharry Baby’, often referred to as the chocolate orchid. A new, equally delectable version of ‘Sharry Baby’ is Heaven Scent ‘Redolence’.

If you are short on space or sill, then try the diminutive ‘Twinkle’, which is a cross between Oncidium sotoanum and the dwarf Oncidium cheirophorum. ‘Twinkle’ has a strong vanilla fragrance and sits perfectly on your kitchen windowsill.

To see some of these lovely ladies on display, join us for the opening of The Orchid Show: Chandeliers on Saturday, February 28, where we will have them dangling from chandeliers in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, complemented by BHdos—a troupe of dancing ladies and gentleman of a less leafy green variety performing on stage in the Ross Auditorium and Lecture Hall.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2015/02/horticulture-2/dancing-ladies/

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In the Alive of Winter

Kristine Paulus is NYBG’s Plant Records Manager. She is responsible for the curation of The Lionel Goldfrank III Computerized Catalog of the Living Collections. She manages nomenclature standards and the plant labels for all exhibitions, gardens, and collections, while coordinating with staff, scientists, students and the public on all garden-related plant information.


Ladies Border
A non-horticulturist friend recently asked me “So, what do you do in winter? The Garden must close because everything is dead, right?”

Wrong! I assured this silly weather wimp that we do not overwinter in any hibernacula and there is actually a lot to see during wintertide, which just happens to be my favorite time of year. For those with a serious aversion to the fourth season, or perhaps suffering from chionophobia, they can always take shelter in the gorgeous glasshouse that is the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory. There, they will see the remarkable pageant of tropical gems that will alleviate their shivers, from our most recent exhibition, Wild Medicine in the Tropics, to The Orchid Show: Chandeliers, opening soon, as well as the permanent collection of plants.

However, as someone who particularly enjoys horticulture al fresco, I love to remind the winter naysayers that the sun is actually closer to us these months and that many of our beloved perennials require a period of vernalization in order to flower in the spring. If those fun facts fail to impress, you can (and should!) just get out and see for yourself the many cool plants the Garden’s winter landscape has to offer. Remember, you got to be cold to be cool.

Betula nigra river birch with peeling bark

River birch (Betula nigra) with peeling bark

Sure, there are great evergreen conifers (what my aforementioned friend would call “Christmas trees”) to enjoy in winter, but without the distraction of leaves, the bark of many deciduous trees stands out in an eye-catching array of colors and patterns. While you’re exfoliating your own skin this winter, commiserate with trees that have a dramatically peeling epidermis. Look for the paperbark maple (Acer griseum) across from Seasonal Walk and river birch (Betula nigra) in the Native Plant Garden with their translucent outer layers glowing like thin sheets of amber in the sun. Throughout the Garden you’ll recognize bright and aptly named paper birch (Betula papyrifera) resembling wintry woodcuts with its stark black and white lines of horizontal lenticels. If you’re freezing, ask a shagbark hickory (Carya ovata) to lend you its woolly-looking coat. Other notable skins include red snake-bark maple (Acer capillipes) and moosewood or striped maple (Acer pensylvanicum) whose common names drop hints about their appearance.

Many of us are familiar with the “camouflage” bark pattern on the London planetree (Platanus × hispanica), an allée of which greets visitors entering through Conservatory Gate, but variations on this can be seen on eastern sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), kousa dogwood (Cornus kousa), Japanese stewartia (Stewartia pseudocamellia), and crape-myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica). The Pinus bungeana (lacebark pine) by the Reflecting Pool not only sports the camo look but also has gleaming silvery bark so metallic you can practically see your own reflection. Of course, this barely scratches the phloem on this topic—we could wax at length about bark, enough to write a book on that topic. In fact, you can find many in the LuEsther T. Mertz Library.

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For further proof that everything is not—and in fact nothing is—dead, there are the winter-flowering wonders to boggle the mind! Chinese witch-hazel (Hamamelis mollis) is exploding with super fragrant and bright yellow spidery flowers along Conservatory Drive, as is the exotic-looking fragrant wintersweet (Chimonanthus praecox) in the Home Gardening Center. As you walk around the Garden, be sure to look down to see snowdrops popping out through the snow (perfectly normal for Galanthus sp.).

Magnolia × soulangeana 'Rustic Rubra'

Magnolia bud (Magnolia × soulangeana ‘Rustic Rubra’)

Winter is also a time of fervent promise. Many trees and shrubs develop their buds in the fall and as they make their way toward spring, they take on visually interesting traits. Pussy willows may get all the buzz with their cute fuzz, but check out the supersize buds on magnolias in the Magnolia Collection in the eastern part of the Garden between Twin Lakes and the Family Garden. I dare you to resist petting them. The Persian ironwood (Parrotia persica) by the entrance to the Benenson Ornamental Conifers is about to burst open with its bright red sea urchin-shaped flowers (another two for one here—it has camouflage bark!). Seriously silky tassles are swelling on the Ladies Border paperbush (Edgeworthia chrysantha) and Viburnum × bodnantense ‘Dawn’ will likely pleasure our olfactory glands before the last snowflake has melted.

There are many adages and proverbs about acting early—some will get you worms, some will make you healthy, wealthy, and wise. I don’t know if one who hesitates will be lost in the Garden, but I am certain that they will definitely miss out on all the exciting winter botanical action.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2015/02/horticulture-2/in-the-alive-of-winter/

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Take a Sneak Peek at The Orchid Show: Chandeliers

In less than two weeks, a beloved annual exhibition returns to the Garden in a dramatic new form as The Orchid Show: Chandeliers. For its 13th year, The Orchid Show is taking over every gallery in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory with a series of hanging installations of living chandeliers. Check out the exclusive teaser trailer below for a first look at the hundreds of the many colorful and fragrant species that will be on display!

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2015/02/video/take-a-sneak-peek-at-the-orchid-show-chandeliers/

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Morning Eye Candy: Peppermint Stripes

Sorry about the misleading title, but I could think of nothing but spring-colored peppermints when I saw these orchids waiting for their moment in the spotlight during The Orchid Show. See them for yourself beginning February 28.

Orchids

Orchids in the Haupt Conservatory – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2015/02/photography/morning-eye-candy-peppermint-stripes/

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Wild Medicine Photo Contest Winners: Week 3

wild medicine photo contst haupt conservatory orchidsThe Wild Medicine Photo Contest is now in its final week, and the deadline for submissions is 6 p.m. tomorrow to qualify for the fourth round of weekly winners and be considered for the Grand Prize. The latest winners in the Macro and Sense of Place categories have been selected, so click through to admire the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory through the eyes of these visionary participants.

There is still time to upload your own shots to the NYBG Flickr Group Pool—tagged “#wildmedicine2015“—to qualify for a free seat in the Adult Education Photography class of your choice. Be sure to check out the contest rules first if you’re not familiar with our annual competition, and good luck to everyone!

 


Macro

First Place: “DSC_0440″ by Tyler Halecky

 

 


First Runner Up: “IMGP1291″ by Peter Moore

 


Second Runner-Up: “DSC_0449″ by Tyler Halecky


Sense of Place

First Place: “IMGP1360″ by Peter Moore

 


First Runner-Up: “IMGP1198″ by Peter Moore

 


 

Second Runner-Up: “DSC_0447″ by Tyler Halecky


Congratulations to this week’s winners!

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2015/02/photography/wild-medicine-photo-contest-winners-week-3/

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Wild Medicine Photo Contest Winners: Week 3

wild medicine photo contst haupt conservatory orchidsThe Wild Medicine Photo Contest is now in its final week, and the deadline for submissions is 6 p.m. tomorrow to qualify for the fourth round of weekly winners and be considered for the Grand Prize. The latest winners in the Macro and Sense of Place categories have been selected, so click through to admire the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory through the eyes of these visionary participants.

There is still time to upload your own shots to the NYBG Flickr Group Pool—tagged “#wildmedicine2015“—to qualify for a free seat in the Adult Education Photography class of your choice. Be sure to check out the contest rules first if you’re not familiar with our annual competition, and good luck to everyone!

 


Macro

First Place: “DSC_0440″ by Tyler Halecky

 

 


First Runner Up: “IMGP1291″ by Peter Moore

 


Second Runner-Up: “DSC_0449″ by Tyler Halecky


Sense of Place

First Place: “IMGP1360″ by Peter Moore

 


First Runner-Up: “IMGP1198″ by Peter Moore

 


 

Second Runner-Up: “DSC_0447″ by Tyler Halecky


Congratulations to this week’s winners!

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