Morning Eye Candy: Hop to It

If you could see into the future of this plant, you’d see a foamy head, elegant glass lacing, and the perfect balance of bitterness and aroma. You’d also see a keg, a tap, and many happy bar patrons. These little green clusters of love are hops, and it’s likely that they’ll find their way into the collaborative beer being brewed by the Bronx Brewery. Check out the whole story right over here.

Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

This entry was posted
on Tuesday, August 28th, 2012 at 6:00 am and is filed under Around the Garden, Photography.
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Article source: http://www.nybg.org/plant-talk/2012/08/photography/morning-eye-candy-hop-to-it-2/

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Design Infused with Nature

Arlene Ellis bridges the gaps between science, art, and fashion with her in-depth study of natural patterns, many of which she details on her website, Organic Lyricism. Here, she relates how her first trip to The New York Botanical Garden informed her latest clothing designs.


I had never heard of textile design while growing up, despite aspiring to become a designer or an artist. In fact, I only became familiar with the word “textile” last fall, a bit weird considering I began drawing patterns at age 15. This was the year that I discovered the phenomenon of fractals in nature.

Fractals are geometric shapes that can be divided into smaller parts, each resembling the overall shape of the whole, regardless of scale. After learning about these fascinating designs, I began noticing them everywhere–in trees, ferns, snowflakes, and in natural formations. This preoccupation eventually sparked my interest in the ultimate fractal-like structure: the brain. In college, however, I soon proved to be more interested in drawing these patterns than I was in studying my neuroscience textbooks.

My interests were leaning heavily in one direction, but despite my constant drawing of patterns, textile design was still a foreign concept to me. It wasn’t until I began taking courses at New York’s School of Visual Arts that this changed. I learned that textile design would help me to unite my love for biological patterns with my love for art. I grew to understand that textile design plays a pivotal role in our daily lives; these patterns adorn our clothes, our bedding, our carpets and furniture. And I realized that I could use these visuals to communicate the beauty of nature to people on an intimate level. After visiting The New York Botanical Garden for the first time in June, that’s just what I set out to do.

I fell in love with so many flowers during my NYBG visit. Some were begging to be turned into textile designs.


Beyond their immediate beauty, I have something of an intellectual crush on patterns. There are at least a few reasons why.


Patterns have an interdisciplinary fan base
Designs are studied not only by artists, but also by scientists, engineers, mathematicians and by those of other disciplines.

Patterns make learning easier
Whether you’re studying the relationship between cells, tissues, and organs; or between lines, values, and colors; patterns help you solve problems.

Patterns reinforce our connection to nature
Tree branches resemble blood vessels. The grooved surfaces of certain corals resemble the brain. Nature is full of patterns that we can relate to one another.


It’s this holistic perspective on patterns that inspired me to choose The New York Botanical Garden as my source for textile design inspiration. The NYBG brings artists and scientists together through its impressive educational offerings, and it offers a stunning oasis to people from all walks of life to come and witness nature’s gorgeous collection of designs. Finally, the NYBG reminds people that we, too, are natural beings comprised of the same elements found in the plants around us.

Since visiting the NYBG for the first time in June, my floral pattern library continues to grow. I want to show people how patterns found in nature can enrich their lives. And maybe, along the way, I’ll inspire them to create designs of their own.

For more on my explorations of patterns and design, visit Organic Lyricism.


Looking to uncover your artistic knack? The Garden offers plenty of opportunities to pick up painting, illustration, or any number of other disciplines in botanical art. Visit the Adult Education page for a list of our current and upcoming courses. And if you’ve also been inspired by the Garden to create something, tell us your story! Simply email us at blog@nybg.org.

This entry was posted
on Thursday, July 19th, 2012 at 11:00 am and is filed under Around the Garden, Learning Experiences, People.
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Article source: http://www.nybg.org/plant-talk/2012/07/people/design-infused-with-nature/

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This Father’s Day Weekend: Veggies Around the World!

A herd of us, myself included, skipped out on our desks yesterday to spend the morning in the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, picking our way through the planted rows and soaking up the spring weather. We’re not truants so much as curious and hungry, really. After a few minutes chatting with the Family Garden’s Assistant Manager, Annie Novak, we can’t think of a better place to let loose with your kids over the weekend.

I’m not just saying that because Annie kindly let us pluck a couple of sugarsnap pea pods to munch on, either. (After much whining and pleading on our part, though totally worth the effort considering how crispy-delightful they were).

More than an oasis of everyday New York staples, this foodie bonanza is also the host of Global Gardens, where five international green thumbs are tending plots that represent the home-grown veggies of their countries’ cuisines: Italian, Irish, Korean, Chinese, and Caribbean. And (perfect timing, I know) this weekend marks their Summer Harvest Celebration!

On both Saturday and Sunday, kids can bring dad along to bounce between each of the five plots, making cultural crafts with the gardeners, playing garden games, and sampling salads made from our own just-picked ingredients. Spending time with him on Father’s Day really can be about more than a new set of cufflinks and pancakes in bed. And if you bring him at 2 or 4 p.m. on either day, you’ll also be at the Family Garden in time for one of our cooking demonstrations. With an acre of fresh vegetables to see and learn about beyond the Global Gardens plots, the herbs of Italy and the greens of South Korea are appetizer courses in one of the most delicious collections at the NYBG.

Not that you have to get your hands dirty when you visit us! Monet’s Garden is still dropping jaws left and right in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, and as the sun sets on Saturday, all that beauty will come to a head in time for an early Father’s Day night out. If you haven’t gotten your tickets to the inaugural Monet Evening, I’m not-so-subtly nudging you in the ribs; missing out on classic French love songs, Parisian cocktails, and the once-in-a-blue-moon experience of a Garden picnic at dusk sounds like a serious faux pas to me.


Saturday, June 16

Bird Walk – 11 a.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool

The diverse habitats of the Botanical Garden offer visitors a chance to see dozens of species of birds throughout the year. Bring your binoculars and walk the Garden grounds with our expert, Debbie Becker, searching for the birds of the season and learning about bird-friendly plants that provide food, shelter, and nesting sites. You might even catch a glimpse of our rare Pileated Woodpeckers, which Debbie tells us are now nesting at the NYBG after a 73-year absence!

Rose Garden Tour – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden

Immerse yourself in the fragrance, color, and beauty of the award-winning Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden on a tour with a Garden docent. Learn the differences between Heritage and Modern roses and between floribundas and hybrid teas, as well as facts about rose history, cultivation, and folklore. Afterward, visit our Earth-Kind® Trial Beds for a look at the hardy roses that may very well change the face of the rosarian’s trade.

Film Screening: Monet Double Feature
In the Conservatory GreenSchool

The Impressionists: Monet – 1 2 p.m.
This film is a look at the life and art of Claude Monet, the originator of “Impressionism.” Examine several paintings, location footage, and expert analysis. Also featured is footage from L’Orangerie and from Monet’s house and gardens at Giverny, plus special film shot at London’s Savoy Hotel, where Monet painted his famous views of London.

Monet’s Palate – 3 4 p.m.
Embark on a culinary tour of Claude Monet’s beloved Normandy, a region of France just north of Paris along the Seine River. This region inspired Monet’s passion for art and his passion for fine cuisine. Both Monet’s palette and his palate met at this home in Giverny, surrounded by his beautiful gardens. This film, connecting the painter’s love of art, gardens, and his profound appreciation for food, is introduced by Academy Award-winning actress Meryl Streep and features commentary from Alice Waters, Daniel Boulud, Michel Richard, and other renowned chefs. Screening of Monet’s Palate made possible by MonetsPalate.com.

Home Gardening Demonstration: Stop and Smell the Roses – 2 p.m.
In the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden

By mid-June, the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden is in full bloom. Join Gardener for Public Education Sonia Uyterhoeven for an exploration of the Rose Garden and a look at some of the highlights of the season.

Monet’s Garden Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Join one of the Garden’s docents for a tour inside the galleries of the historic Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, where horticulturists of The New York Botanical Garden bring to life stunning re-creations of Monet’s most iconic gardens at Giverny. In the Conservatory Courtyard, the focus on the artistry of the great Impressionist continues with a display of water lilies.

Monet Evenings Featuring Water Lily Concerts – 6 to 9 p.m. / Concert – 7:30 p.m.
In the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory and on the Conservatory Lawn
June 16 event features Jazz Cabaret Chanteuse Floanne

Experience Monet’s Garden in the waning evening light. Purchase a glass of wine or a cocktail and light refreshments, admire the collections and relax on the lawn for a live concert. Each evening will feature a different style of music–jazz, cabaret, or classical–with a French theme ranging from old world to new, and from charming to glamorous.

Each ticket includes one specialty complimentary cocktail or non-alcoholic beverage. ($30 Non-members, $20 Members, $12 Children)


Sunday, June 17

Rose Garden Tour – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden

Immerse yourself in the fragrance, color, and beauty of the award-winning Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden on a tour with a Garden docent. Learn the differences between Heritage and Modern roses and between floribundas and hybrid teas, as well as facts about rose history, cultivation, and folklore. After the tour, head to the Earth-Kind® Trial Beds for a look at breeds that may very well change the face of the rosarian’s trade.

Film Screening: Monet Double Feature
In the Conservatory GreenSchool

The Impressionists: Monet – 1 2 p.m.
This film is a look at the life and art of Claude Monet, the originator of “Impressionism.” Examine several paintings, location footage, and expert analysis. Also featured is footage from L’Orangerie and from Monet’s house and gardens at Giverny, plus special film shot at London’s Savoy Hotel, where Monet painted his famous views of London.

Monet’s Palate – 3 4 p.m.
Embark on a culinary tour of Claude Monet’s beloved Normandy, a region of France just north of Paris along the Seine River. This region inspired Monet’s passion for art and his passion for fine cuisine. Both Monet’s palette and his palate met at this home in Giverny, surrounded by his beautiful gardens. This film, connecting the painter’s love of art, gardens, and his profound appreciation for food, is introduced by Academy Award-winning actress Meryl Streep and features commentary from Alice Waters, Daniel Boulud, Michel Richard, and other renowned chefs. Screening of Monet’s Palate made possible by MonetsPalate.com.

Home Gardening Demonstration: Stop and Smell the Roses – 2 p.m.
In the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden

By mid-June, the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden is in full bloom. Join Gardener for Public Education Sonia Uyterhoeven for an exploration of the Rose Garden and a look at some of the highlights of the season.

Monet’s Garden Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Join one of the Garden’s docents for a tour inside the galleries of the historic Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, where horticulturists of The New York Botanical Garden bring to life stunning re-creations of Monet’s most iconic gardens at Giverny. In the Conservatory Courtyard, the focus on the artistry of the great Impressionist continues with a display of water lilies.


Ongoing Children’s Programs

Children’s Outdoor Nature Explorations: Observe and Create
Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, May 19 through September 30
Weekdays 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. / Weekends 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Let your inner Monet run wild and be inspired by nature to create art in all different forms. Movement, music, drawing and painting abound in this outdoor studio for children. Stop by Inspiration Station to play our outdoor marimba. Paint with water and experiment with colors in our Color Clash Studio. Step inside to experiment with the engineering behind aquatic plants. Nature is art–discover it at the Adventure Garden. Also on view: an exhibition by students from Studio in a School.

Salad Days
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, May 19 through June 15
1:30 to 5:30 p.m.

The “salad days” of the Garden year are here! The finale of spring is a bonanza of ripe roots, succulent stems, glorious greens, and a kaleidoscope of colorful–and edible–flowers. Use real plants and flowers to decorate a salad bowl collage. Learn tips on how to combine this array of plant parts into an assortment of salads and prepare a healthy dressing to take home.

Cooking demonstrations at 2 and 4 p.m. on Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays.

Global Gardens Summer Harvest Celebration Weekend
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, June 16 through 17
1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Celebrate the spring harvest season of our five Global Gardens. Earn stamps in your passport by exploring each of the Global Gardens: meet the Global Gardeners, play garden games, create cultural crafts, or sample salads.

Cooking demonstrations at 2 and 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

This entry was posted
on Friday, June 15th, 2012 at 2:47 pm and is filed under Around the Garden.
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Article source: http://www.nybg.org/plant-talk/2012/06/around-the-garden/this-fathers-day-weekend-veggies-around-the-world/

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A Way to Heal Mind, Body, and Spirit

New Summer Intensive classes in Horticultural Therapy start July 9!


Lori Bloomberg, NYBG Horticultural Therapy student, in the Enid A. Haupt Glass Garden

Among the lesser-known public gardens in New York City is the Enid A. Haupt Glass Garden, an amazing urban oasis located at the Rusk Institute for Rehabilitation. That’s where Lori Bloomberg first learned about horticultural therapy and where she fell in love with the people and the curriculum of the program.

“It just felt like home,” explains Lori. “And after a year of volunteering, I learned about the NYBG Horticultural Therapy Certificate Program with classes in the city, and decided to enroll. I started classes slowly in the regular program, and then I did the Horticultural Therapy Summer Intensive to accelerate the learning schedule.”

Lori majored in fine arts and design in college and she worked in graphic arts most of her career. Discovering the field of horticultural therapy was like finding a new way not only to heal the body and mind, but the spirit as well.

Horticultural therapy is in fact one of the oldest healing therapies and is a widely recognized form of treatment for people with physical or mental disabilities. The Rusk Institute launched one of the nation’s first horticultural therapy programs in the 1970s with support from Enid A. Haupt, whose philanthropy also made the eponymous conservatory here at the NYBG what it is today. The Rusk program expanded in the ’90s with the addition of a perennial garden, also funded by Mrs. Haupt.

Children and adult patients from each of the Rusk units grow plants, arrange flowers, and make nature craft projects, gaining a sense of personal accomplishment, productivity, and self-reliance while guided by trained horticultural therapists. One of the therapists, Matthew J. Wichrowski, is also on the faculty at NYBG, having taught some of Lori’s most memorable classes.

“Matthew and the other NYBG horticultural therapy instructors are just amazing—very efficient and giving, as well as very thorough,” says Lori. “My favorite memories are of these teachers and how passionate they are about their classes. Gary Lincoff and his mushrooms; John Beirne and his magnolia blossoms; activity plans with Pat Czarnecki; and Phyllis D’Amico, with whom we planted wheat grass in total darkness to experience what it’s like to work without sight.”

Lori recently completed the 100-hour NYBG certificate requirement while interning at the Rusk Institute, and she continues to intern there while finishing her course work. She hopes to graduate soon and is excited about a new career working with children and the elderly. “It will be a totally new direction for me,” she says.


Registration for the 2012 Horticultural Therapy Summer Intensive Classes is now open, offering students the opportunity to fulfill–in just a few weeks–many hours required for a certificate. Courses begin July 9! To register, or for more information, visit our Adult Education site or call 800-322-NYBG (x6924).

Photo courtesy of Yuji Nakahashi.

This entry was posted
on Wednesday, May 30th, 2012 at 4:19 pm and is filed under Adult Education, Learning Experiences, People, Testimonials.
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Article source: http://www.nybg.org/plant-talk/2012/05/people/a-way-to-heal-mind-body-and-spirit/

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Morning Eye Candy: The Thomas Effect

Do the kids visiting the NYBG love Thomas the Tank Engine™? That’s a little like asking if the moon guides the tides. Just imagine what it would be like if these parents didn’t have the blue locomotive to keep the little ones quiet for a few spare moments. Better yet, don’t–it’s traumatic to consider.

Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

This entry was posted
on Saturday, January 14th, 2012 at 6:00 am and is filed under Around the Garden, Photography.
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Article source: http://www.nybg.org/plant-talk/2012/01/photography/morning-eye-candy-the-thomas-effect/

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Organic Roses and how to grow them

Breeding organic roses may be on the best things you will ever do You are able to improve the beauty of your garden without hurting mother earth See, when you grow roses organically, you do away with destructive chemicals that may pose a threat to the world we live in and your love ones Yet the beauty of roses will inspire you and make you happy

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rain!rain!!rain!!!

Author: greenfairy

Posted: Tue Jun 07, 2011 5:35 am (GMT 0)


The monsoon has set in at the right time. rains everyday, keeps on raining. work outside is not easy. plants need a lot of trimming and pruning once the rain slows down. but the heat of the summer has gone, it is very cool this time of the year.



i had been waiting for this plant to flower for a very long time. and this year, it has bloomed. i just love the fragrance it gives, heavenly.





mexican tuberose – polianthus tuberosa ( photo / image / picture from greenfairy’s Garden )





beautiful ( photo / image / picture from greenfairy’s Garden )



this is one more of my plants, once it blooms, it stays for along time, each opening to give blue, yellow clours











flaming torch – billbergia pyramidalis ( photo / image / picture from greenfairy’s Garden )





















( photo / image / picture from greenfairy’s Garden )







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Is It Time to Clean the Carpet?

If there is one aspect of home maintenance that is commonly overlooked, and sometimes forgotten on purpose, it’s cleaning the carpets. For many, it is a chore they dread, but for me, it’s a Zen experience that I actually look forward to.

Your carpets get vacuumed regularly, but there is still dirt and grime that gets stamped into it that a vacuum cannot get out. This is especially true at main thoroughfares such as the front door area and dining room where people are constantly going in and out.

When should you clean your carpets? I clean mine at least once a month, but I have three children and two dogs that love to track everything in that they can. It really depends on how traveled your house is and the conditions that the rugs are exposed to. A single person or a couple with no children in an upstairs apartment may not have many problems.

A family of five in a single-family home in the wet and snowy wilderness of the Midwest may be better off just buying their own carpet cleaner. After a few weeks of mud and dirt, your carpets can look dingy. During the summer, when there isn’t much water to worry about, you may not have to clean the carpets at all.

Once you decide to clean your carpet, the next decision is whether to buy a carpet cleaner or rent one. If you only clean it a few times a year, then just rent the carpet cleaner. A Rug Doctor or other brand tends to be more powerful and hold more water than the standard commercial ones sold in stores. If you clean the carpet once a month or more, then just buy the carpet cleaner and save yourself the time and effort of renting and lugging it to and from the store.

The actual act of carpet cleaning is simple. The machine shoots out a blast of hot soapy water into the floor and a vacuum sucks it back up again along with the dirt. The one thing you need to be careful of is that these types of cleaners will leave the carpet wet when finished, so place a fan in the room to help dry. Mold can develop overtime if the carpet doesn’t dry fast enough.

When finished, the carpet looks fantastic and is about three shades brighter than it was before.

Image Source: flickr.com/photos/juliesjournal/2993449571

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  1. Organic Carpet Cleaner
  2. Carpet Deal in the New Year – Self Stick Carpet Tiles
  3. The Perfect Vacuum Cleaner

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Winter Asters

 Asters*,  the stars of Autumn,  have a  have a second life at Clay and Limestone each winter. 

 Asters (as they were known then) and other endemic Central Basin natives grew with happy abandon in the forested woodland where C and L now stands.  Sixty years ago a neighborhood was carved from the woods and a house was built.  Homeowners came and went,  while  the asters grew quietly  on the woodland  edge.  Twenty five years ago this brand new  gardener fell head over heals in love with the blue clouds of flowers that were covered with bees and butterflies in the yard of her new home.  They  so captured my heart,  that I built a garden  around them.   I’ve allowed them to  root and seed  themselves with abandon.  Symphyotrichum shortii, Symphyotrichum cordifolium, Symphyotrichum dumosus, Eurybia divaricata, Symphyotrichum lateriflorum, Symphyotrichum priceae, and Symphyotrichum ericoides var. ericoides  have  spilled into the paths,  crept into the wildflower beds and  cozied  up to the benches all over Clay and Limestone.

Each fall they fade to  seedy gorgeousness.

They  spill over  into the paths, 

they creep into the wildflower beds and,

 they cozy up to the benches.
 

Where they have become the stars of my winter garden.





Isn’t nature grand!

xxoogail

More on Clay and Limestone’s asters
Little Asters Everywhere (here)
Natives For Fall Color (here)
This Is The Place To Bee (here)
Central Basin Wildflowers (here)

This post was written by Gail Eichelberger for my blog Clay and Limestone Copyright 2011.This work protected under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Please contact me for permission to copy, reproduce, scrape, etc.

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How aggressive IS it?

How aggressive IS it?
Posted by mgervais

Here’s a gorgeous sweep of houttuynia at Cornell Plantations in Ithaca, New York. I fell in love with this plant then and there, and I think it’s beautiful, but every time we feature houttuynia…

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