Common Ground Fair and Lawn Games Make an Ideal Match

UNITY, MAINE — The SafeLawns Foundation combined old-fashioned outdoor fun with landscape education at this year’s Common Ground Fair in Unity, Maine, during its annual three-day run in late September.
It became a family affair for SafeLawns founder Paul Tukey, who was joined at the educational booth by his 71-year-old mother, Charlotte, and her fiancé, Ralph Beckwith, on Friday. Paul’s 19-year-old son, Paul III, then helped out on Friday and Saturday as hundreds of the 59,000 fairgoers enjoyed the Lawn Games for Life! exhibit set up next to the SafeLawns booth.
Featuring several of the games from the book, Tag, Toss Run: 40 Classic Lawn Games — including Hoop Trundling, Bocce, Croquet, Kubb, Molkky, Ladder Golf and Frisbee, among others — the Lawn Games for Life! area proved to be popular with all ages.
“After a year of traveling the nation with these games, the Fair brought it all together,” said Paul Tukey Sr. “There is no better time to remind parents about the risks associated with synthetic chemical lawn care than when their children are actually rolling around in the grass having a good time. Health risks should never have to be a part of a family’s outdoor experience. For these three days, at least, pesticide exposure wasn’t a care.”

Article source: http://www.safelawns.org/blog/2012/10/common-ground-fair-and-lawn-games-make-an-ideal-match/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=common-ground-fair-and-lawn-games-make-an-ideal-match

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Common Ground Fair and Lawn Games for Life! Make an Ideal Match

Charlotte Tukey, mother of SafeLawns founder Paul Tukey, enjoys a game of ladder golf with her fiancé, Ralph Beckwith.

UNITY, MAINE — The SafeLawns Foundation combined old-fashioned outdoor fun with landscape education at this year’s Common Ground Fair in Unity, Maine, during its annual three-day run in late September.

It became a family affair for SafeLawns founder Paul Tukey, who was joined at the educational booth by his 71-year-old mother, Charlotte, and her fiancé, Ralph Beckwith, on Friday. Paul’s 19-year-old son, Paul III, then helped out on Friday and Saturday as hundreds of the 59,000 fairgoers enjoyed the Lawn Games for Life! exhibit set up next to the SafeLawns booth.

Featuring several of the games from the book, Tag, Toss Run: 40 Classic Lawn Games — including Hoop Trundling, Bocce, Croquet, Kubb, Molkky, Ladder Golf and Frisbee, among others — the Lawn Games for Life! area proved to be popular with all ages.

“After a year of traveling the nation with these games, the Fair brought it all together,” said Paul Tukey Sr. “There is no better time to remind parents about the risks associated with synthetic chemical lawn care than when their children are actually rolling around in the grass having a good time. Health risks should never have to be a part of a family’s outdoor experience. For these three days, at least, pesticide exposure wasn’t a care.”

Here are a few other scenes from this year’s Fair:

This old-fashioned wooden croquet set, on loan from LL Bean in Freeport, was put to constant use and brought back a raft of childhood memories for many fairgoers.

These wooden hoops, on loan from the Cooperman Company of Vermont, are typically used for “trundling” or racing through the grass. This particular fairgoer drew a crowd with her innovative hoop dance.

Teenagers gravitated toward the giant flying disk.

The game of Bocce, also loaned by LL Bean in Freeport, was a hit with all age groups.

Article source: http://www.safelawns.org/blog/2012/10/common-ground-fair-and-lawn-games-for-life-make-an-ideal-match/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=common-ground-fair-and-lawn-games-for-life-make-an-ideal-match

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Tag, Toss & Run: ‘What a Cool Little Book!’

With organic lawn care education and advocacy taking up much of our time of late, it’s always a great bonus when our other focus, outdoor lawn games, finds its way to the public consciousness all on its own.

Booklist, an on-line resource that includes more than 130,000 reviews, focused on our book Tag, Toss Run: 40 Classic Lawn Games this week: http://bookends.booklistonline.com/2012/08/27/tag-toss-run-by-paul-tukey-victoria-rowell/. Middle school librarians and frequent reviewers Cindy Dobrez and Lynn Rutan were effusive in their praise of our book, a call to arms to get children back outside.

“This book might just inspire a whole new set of memories for this generation of kids!” wrote Rutan.

“What a cool little book!” said Dobrez.

The Lawn Games for Life! campaign inspired by the book will be center stage at the upcoming Common Ground Fair in Unity, Maine, for the nation’s largest celebration of all things sustainable. The dates are the 20th-22nd of September and it’s well worth the trip, no matter where you live in America.

Article source: http://www.safelawns.org/blog/index.php/2012/08/tag-toss-run-what-a-cool-little-book/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tag-toss-run-what-a-cool-little-book

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My First Close-Up Encounter

Patricia Gonzalez is an NYBG volunteer and avid wildlife photographer. She can often be found taking photographs around the Garden.


It was a little after noon on February 26 of 2009 that I enjoyed one of the most amazing experiences of my life. By that time, I had already been shooting photographs at The New York Botanical Garden for a year, and it seemed like every creature living in the Garden had cooperated with my camera except for one species: the Red-tailed Hawks which often hunt throughout the NYBG. I had been able to get a few shots, but always from a distance and far overhead.

Other times, I couldn’t ready my camera fast enough and my subject matter would disappear into the sky.

On that particular day in February, my luck changed. I was walking along the path bordering the white pines (today, that area is also home to the Earth-Kind® rose trial beds) when suddenly something fell from the trees and landed in the grass. I was shocked to see a beautiful Red-tailed Hawk holding on to what I thought was a snake. So I readied my camera and began shooting; I didn’t want to scare the bird away, but at the same time, I really wanted to get some close-ups. Every time my subject would look down at the snake, I would move a few steps closer and duck behind a tree. Eventually, I got close enough to see that it wasn’t a snake in the bird’s talons, but a branch.

While holding onto the branch, the raptor flapped its wings, just in time for me to catch it in a magnificent pose.

The hawk then flew into a nearby tree, only to jump down and pounce on the branch again. After a few minutes, it took off, landing in another tree further up the slope. I followed along until I was close enough to get the photos I wanted, standing just below eye level with the hawk as it groomed itself. Within 20 minutes I had taken nearly 150 photos. The hawk looked right at me at one point, showing off its striking, yellow eyes.

A few more minutes of grooming, and then it was off.

By the time the hawk flew away, I felt like I had made a real connection with nature, the likes of which I hadn’t experienced before. I was so overwhelmed with the thought of seeing how my photographs came out that I immediately stopped snapping, ran for the Mosholu gate, and jumped on the BX-26 bus. All 300 images were uploaded as soon as I got home, and I must say I was pleased; I couldn’t believe how beautiful the bird was.

Each time I head into the Forest in search of these raptors, I find myself experiencing that same sense of deep connection with the natural world. It’s a sensory awakening. On that day I imagined what the Garden grounds must have been like in the time when this land was kept by the Lorillards. It wasn’t until April of 2009 that I would learn of Rose and Hawkeye, the mated pair of hawks that was building a nest at the NYBG’s Library Building; that year, they added three new members to their growing family. In the three years that have passed since, I’ve taken hundreds of photographs of my Red-tailed friends flying, hunting, playing, and bathing. Honestly, it never gets old.

More than just a chance to enjoy New York’s most beautiful flora, the Garden is one of the city’s most beloved places to connect with all sorts of native wildlife. So if you’d like an opportunity of your own to see wild hawks and other animals in their natural environment–all year round–why not become a Garden Member? A membership gives you access to The New York Botanical Garden for an entire year, and offers plenty of benefits beyond open access to the grounds. For more information, visit our sign-up page.


All photos courtesy of Patricia Gonzalez.

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Article source: http://www.nybg.org/plant-talk/2012/08/around-the-garden/my-first-close-up-encounter/

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Where the Wild Things Are

When you’re home to more than 250 acres of flora, you don’t have to stray far to uncover a virtual menagerie of fauna within it. Cormorants and wood ducks draw zig-zags in the duckweed of Twin Lakes, while Red-tailed Hawks hunt skinks and black squirrels from far overhead. There’s even a cranky snapping turtle or two. But for every rabbit or warbler out to make itself seen in the NYBG, there’s another species living out its life away from our cameras! As Director of the Forest, Jessica A. Schuler has turned some of her focus toward the elusive creatures living in our woodland.

Through a collaboration with Jason Munshi-South of CUNY Baruch College and Mark Weckel of Mianus River Gorge Preserve, Jessica is doing her part to help the pair document the many animals living throughout the city and Westchester county, as well as the effects of the urban environment on evolutionary biology. In the case of the NYBG, this is done by arranging four motion-activated, all-weather cameras in locations throughout the Garden’s 50-acre Forest, ready to capture the movements of any and all woodland wanderers that might amble by. And after only a month on site, capture they did! Calibrated to go off at even the slightest hint of a passing animal, these cameras accurately snapped shots of several familiar species lurking in our woods.

One of our Great Horned Owls comes in for a closer look.


When anything wanders into view of the lens, the motion-capture camera quickly takes a stream of five shots, with the goal of recording as much as possible before the animal strolls (or flaps) out of view. But, as you can see from the above photos, some of our visitors weren’t in much of a hurry. In the case of that owl, this was a rare chance to ham it up without anyone around to ruin the moment. It certainly says something about the innate “dignity” of these majestic raptors, doesn’t it?

According to Jessica, we plan to monitor the woods for some time to come, perhaps in hopes of seeing something none of us could have expected to find living in New York City’s largest old-growth forest. You can be sure I’ll check in later to see if anything new has crept into the spotlight since June’s pictures!

This entry was posted
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Article source: http://www.nybg.org/plant-talk/2012/08/around-the-garden/where-the-wild-things-are/

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Nymphaea Newbies Welcome!

Most weekend green thumbs can handle the odd tray of garden center perennials, and some might even tackle the challenge of the more finicky roses. But when it comes to raising Nymphaea, the leap from yard to pond can be intimidating! We understand the hesitance. This weekend, the NYBG‘s horticultural staff aims to dispel that air of mystery just long enough to help our visitors understand the rewards of growing water lilies at home. With a dash of confidence and the right planting, even New Yorkers can spice up their summer displays with these exotic eye catchers.

For the uninitiated, this is your cue to visit the Garden’s own hardy and tropical water lily ponds in the Conservatory Courtyard, where Nymphaea and Nelumbo, the lotus, are firmly planted in the Monet’s Garden spotlight. It’s where we’re featuring a few of the artist’s favorite cultivars, along with a number of newer creations from the Latour-Marliac Nursery, Monet’s go-to supplier for much of his life at Giverny. Once you’ve experienced these aquatic icons as they’re meant to be seen, and picked up a few pointers on their upkeep, make your way to the Shop in the Garden for the supplies you’ll need to grow water lilies at home!

Demonstration groups are set to meet at 2 p.m. near the Conservatory entrance, both Saturday and Sunday. But there’s more to see and do beyond the water lilies–check it out below!


Saturday, August 4

Monet’s Garden Tour – 12:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Join one of the Garden’s docents for a tour inside the galleries of the historic Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, where horticulturists of The New York Botanical Garden bring to life stunning re-creations of Monet’s most iconic gardens at Giverny. In the Conservatory Courtyard, the focus on the artistry of the great Impressionist continues with a display of water lilies.

Home Gardening Demonstration — Water Lilies: Giverny to NYBG – 2 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Join a Botanical Garden horticulturist who will show you the best ways to care for your aquatic plants. Learn about exciting new varieties of water lilies and learn helpful tips to encourage these beauties to thrive.


Sunday, August 5

Monet’s Garden Tour – 12:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Join one of the Garden’s docents for a tour inside the galleries of the historic Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, where horticulturists of The New York Botanical Garden bring to life stunning re-creations of Monet’s most iconic gardens at Giverny. In the Conservatory Courtyard, the focus on the artistry of the great Impressionist continues with a display of water lilies.

Home Gardening Demonstration — Water Lilies: Giverny to NYBG – 2 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Join a Botanical Garden horticulturist who will show you the best ways to care for your aquatic plants. Learn about exciting new varieties of water lilies and learn helpful tips to encourage these beauties to thrive.


Ongoing Children’s Programs

Children’s Outdoor Nature Explorations: Observe and Create
Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, through September 30
Weekdays 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. / Weekends 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Let your inner Monet run wild and be inspired by nature to create art in all its different forms. Movement, music, drawing and painting abound in this outdoor studio for children. Stop by Inspiration Station to play our outdoor marimba. Paint with water and experiment with colors in our Color Clash Studio. Step inside to experiment with the engineering behind aquatic plants. Nature is art–discover it at the Adventure Garden. Also on view: an exhibition by students from Studio in a School.

Hands-On Gardening Activities for Families: Pickle Me!
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, through August 17
Daily, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. (*1:30 to 4:30 p.m. on August 12 due to Family Dinner event)

Go on a Pickle Parade through the Family Garden to learn about plants–both familiar and unfamiliar–that take part in the pickling process. Learn what it takes to pickle and make your very own batch of pickles to savor back at home. Cooking demonstrations at 2 and 4 p.m. on Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays.

The Edible Garden
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, through October 31
Daily, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. (*1:30 to 4:30 p.m. on August 12 due to Family Dinner event)

The Edible Garden returns to the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden this year, bringing plenty of events for both adults and kids alike with daily, family-friendly activities, cooking demonstrations in the Whole Foods Market Family Garden Kitchen, and hands-on gardening fun.

A Garden friend and chef extraordinaire, Mario Batali takes a featured role in this year’s Edible Garden. Visit the beds of herbs and vegetables in “Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens,” where you can pick up some of his favorite recipes. Later, join Mario and other top chefs for The Edible Garden Festival, featuring tastings, harvest activities, and a chance to sit down to dinner with the man himself. Your culinary delight begins in the garden! Visit summer through fall for the best of the harvest.

This entry was posted
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Article source: http://www.nybg.org/plant-talk/2012/08/around-the-garden/nymphaea-newbies-welcome/

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Minnesota Court Says Pesticide Drift is NOT Trespassing After All

Even if you catch my (pesticide) drift in your lungs or on your skin, it’s not my problem according to a Minnesota court (National Pesticide Information Center photo).

Second-Hand Pesticides Are An Unfortunate Fact of Life

If someone fires a gun or an arrow in your direction that’s clearly violating your space. If someone tosses garbage or a rock toward your house, that violates your rights. If someone even so much as steps foot on your property against your will, well, that’s trespassing and can land the offender in jail.

Reversing a ruling that gave organic farmers hope, however, the Minnesota Supreme Court said yesterday that it’s OK when one farmer allows his or her pesticides to drift to another farm. Or, to put it a different way, what the Court really said amounted to “no harm, no foul” or “out of sight, out of mind.”

Justice Lorie Skjerven Gildea, who wrote the head-scratching opinion, declared pesticide drift to be “intangible and cannot be a form of trespassing.” Here’s the story from the state’s largest newspaper: http://www.startribune.com/local/164607876.html.

The justices did allow that in some extreme cases farmers could sue other farmers for being negligent and causing financial damages, but the burden of proof required would seem to make it a virtual impossibility that cases would ever go to trial.

Beyond the farm, the ruling is seen as a major blow to neighborhoods across the United States where neighbors unwittingly subject their neighbors to toxic drift of lawn and garden chemicals, what we call “second-hand pesticides,” on an almost constant basis. To the Minnesota Supreme Court’s way of thinking, that’s just an intangible part of American life these days.

Note: Here’s a link to the National Pesticide Information Center’s web site on pesticide drift: http://npic.orst.edu/reg/drift.html

Article source: http://www.safelawns.org/blog/index.php/2012/08/minnesota-court-says-pesticide-drift-is-not-trespassing-after-all/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=minnesota-court-says-pesticide-drift-is-not-trespassing-after-all

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A Forgiving Forecast and Plenty to Do

We’re looking at something of a harlequin schedule for this NYBG weekend. We’ll be bouncing between ancient meditative arts and the trade secrets of the rosarian, then back over to organic gardening, garlic and onions, and around to a tour of Monet’s Garden. It’s the best kind of variety! And after enduring what felt like a month’s worth of rain in only a few days’ time, the forecast tells us mother nature is taking a welcome breather. Not only is the weekend likely to sport sunny afternoons, but there shouldn’t be any frightening thermometer readings to scare you back indoors.

For those coming to see Monet’s Garden in its summer finery, the Conservatory display is in rare form right about now. The delphiniums along the Grand Allée are a dusky sky blue, and just outside, the courtyard’s water lily pools are brimming with colors of their own. Even the later-blooming tropical pool is starting to strut a bit! But my personal favorite is easily the ‘Green Smoke’ Nymphaea I found bobbing along the water’s surface yesterday; I can’t think of a better way to phrase the sight than “petals like absinthe.”

If you’re looking to do something for the kids, don’t forget that this is absolutely the last weekend schedule for the Sweet and Stinky activities going on in the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden. Seeing as afternoons in the low 80s are looking scarce this summer, I’m thinking now’s a good time to make use of the few we do get. Maybe that’s your cue to head to the Bronx!


Saturday, July 21

Tai Chi for Peace of Mind and Body — 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Tai Chi is a slow moving, meditative exercise for relaxation, health, and self-defense, originating in China. In this six-session course beginning on the 21st, learn the principles of Tai Chi with an emphasis on correct body posture and spinal alignment. With the practice of Tai Chi, students become revitalized, relaxed, tolerant, self-confident, physically stronger, and ultimately, healthier in both mind and body. (Price includes a $10 material fee.)

Non-Member: $82 / Member: $75

Roses: Summer Pruning Techniques — 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
In the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden

Once roses have produced their first flush of blooms, they can be pruned for continuous re-bloom all the way to fall! Learn the techniques required of the different classes of roses from Rose Garden curator Peter Kukielski. Bring your pruners and gloves and dress appropriately for this hands-on class held in the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden.

Non-Members: $96 / Members: $86

Monet’s Garden Tour – 12:30 (with ASL Interpreter) 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Join one of the Garden’s docents for a tour inside the galleries of the historic Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, where horticulturists of The New York Botanical Garden bring to life stunning re-creations of Monet’s most iconic gardens at Giverny. In the Conservatory Courtyard, the focus on the artistry of the great Impressionist continues with a display of water lilies.

Home Gardening Demonstration: Grow Organic – 2 p.m.
In the Home Gardening Center

Join a Botanical Garden horticulturist who will cover some of the basic principles of organic gardening and provide you with simple sustainable guidelines.


Sunday, July 22

Conservatory Tour: Secrets of This Victorian Glasshouse – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Explore the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, an acre of plants under glass, with one of the Garden’s docents. Take an ecotour around the world through 11 distinct habitats, including two types of rain forest, deserts of the Americas and of Africa, and aquatic and carnivorous plant displays.

Admission included with an All-Garden Pass.

Home Gardening Demonstration: Grow Organic – 2 p.m.
In the Home Gardening Center

Join a Botanical Garden horticulturist who will cover some of the basic principles of organic gardening and provide you with simple sustainable guidelines.

Monet’s Garden Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Join one of the Garden’s docents for a tour inside the galleries of the historic Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, where horticulturists of The New York Botanical Garden bring to life stunning re-creations of Monet’s most iconic gardens at Giverny in Monet’s Garden. In the Conservatory Courtyard, the focus on the artistry of the great Impressionist continues with a display of water lilies.


Ongoing Children’s Programs

Summer Camp: Art in Nature
Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, July 16 through 20
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Children will be artists in the Garden throughout this camp. Each day will include time for drawing, painting, and creating sculptures. Children will embark on outdoor “creativity walks,” as well as choreograph their own dance performances. Each day will be filled with outdoor explorations, hands-on activities, and creating art. The campers will show off their nature-inspired works of art during an art show at the end of the week.

Children’s Outdoor Nature Explorations: Observe and Create
Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, May 19 through September 30
Weekdays 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. / Weekends 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Let your inner Monet run wild and be inspired by nature to create art in all different forms. Movement, music, drawing and painting abound in this outdoor studio for children. Stop by Inspiration Station to play our outdoor marimba. Paint with water and experiment with colors in our Color Clash Studio. Step inside to experiment with the engineering behind aquatic plants. Nature is art–discover it at the Adventure Garden. Also on view: an exhibition by students from Studio in a School.

Hands-On Gardening Activities for Families: Sweet and Stinky
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, June 19 through July 27
Daily, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. (closes at 4:30 p.m. on July 26, August 2, and August 12 for Family Dinner events)

Aromatic alliums and spicy herbs thrive in the summer heat. Follow the sweet and stinky smells to the Family Garden and discover these culinary champions. Savor the scents and tickle your taste buds with cooking demonstrations and samples, and become a green thumb by planting your very own herb to tend at home.

Cooking demonstrations at 2 and 4 p.m. on Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays.

The Edible Garden
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, July 1 through October 31
Daily, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. (Closes at 5 p.m. on July 26, August 2, and August 12 due to Family Dinner events)

The Edible Garden returns to the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden this year, bringing plenty of events for both adults and kids alike with daily, family-friendly activities, cooking demonstrations in the Whole Foods Market Family Garden Kitchen, and hands-on gardening fun.

A Garden friend and chef extraordinaire, Mario Batali takes a featured role in this year’s Edible Garden. Visit the beds of herbs and vegetables in “Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens,” where you can pick up some of his favorite recipes. Later, join Mario and other top chefs for The Edible Garden Festival, featuring tastings, harvest activities, and a chance to sit down to dinner with the man himself. Your culinary delight begins in the garden! Visit summer through fall for the best of the harvest.

This entry was posted
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Article source: http://www.nybg.org/plant-talk/2012/07/around-the-garden/a-forgiving-forecast-and-plenty-to-do/

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Morning Eye Candy: Just About Anywhere

In the immortal words of Jurassic Park’s Dr. Ian Malcolm, “Life finds a way.” …Not that anything has much of a struggle setting down roots in our 250 acres of greenery!

Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

This entry was posted
on Sunday, July 15th, 2012 at 6:00 am and is filed under Around the Garden, Photography.
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Article source: http://www.nybg.org/plant-talk/2012/07/photography/morning-eye-candy-4/

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This Weekend: Verse and Vegetables!

“All beauties, like all possible phenomena, have something of the eternal and something of the ephemeral—of the absolute and the particular.” – Charles Baudelaire

The France of Claude Monet was a landscape beholden to the muse, not only in paint, but in verse, food, and music. Paris was the city of imagination! The city of Erik Satie and Rimbaud, and of the Lost Generation that arrived late in Monet’s life–Stein and Hemingway among them. This weekend, the NYBG partners with the Poetry Society of America to bring the Impressionist’s peers back into the spotlight. Here at the Garden, New York’s finest contemporary poets offer readings of the French Symbolists that inspired them most.

On Saturday, the focus falls on the oeuvre of Charles Baudelaire, an early figure in Monet’s time whose urban prose and verse set the foundation for many of the Symbolists who followed after. And on Sunday we switch gears, taking art to the table for our Family Dinner Event! With Mario Batali’s talented chefs on hand, we’ll venture abroad, looking beyond the recipes of France to bring you Continental flavor with local ingredients (many grown here at the NYBG). While you enjoy garden-inspired teas and wines paired with elegant dishes expertly prepared, the kids can busy themselves with Family Garden adventures. It’s about as high on the win-win scale as you’re ever likely to find yourself.

But if you’re in the city and can’t make it to the Bronx, all is not lost. We’ll be down to party in Manhattan for Bastille Day! You can join the NYBG on 60th street, from 12 to 5 p.m. on Sunday, for three bouncing blocks of French-inspired celebration–food, music, crafts, and a long, long list of other great activities. Garden staff will be on hand making Monet-inspired crepe paper flowers with visitors, and for those with a tooth for adventure, there’s even a trip to Paris up for grabs.

Head below for more on the weekend’s festivities. Summer’s given us a little wiggle room for outdoor adventures this week, and we’re looking for that to continue into Saturday and Sunday. Make the most of it!


Saturday, July 14

Cooking Class: Feasting for Free with Leda Meredith — 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Members: $42, Non-members: $47

The Northeast is rich in delicious, wild edible ingredients, including plants you may have been composting as “weeds.” Learn how to safely identify and sustainably harvest the abundance of free gourmet ingredients growing in this region. Plant identification will be conducted on Garden grounds, including the Thain Family Forest, so dress for the weather. Advance registration is required; you can sign up here.

 

Monet’s Garden Tour – 12:30 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Join one of the Garden’s docents for a tour inside the galleries of the historic Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, where horticulturists of The New York Botanical Garden bring to life stunning re-creations of Monet’s most iconic gardens at Giverny. In the Conservatory Courtyard, the focus on the artistry of the great Impressionist continues with a display of water lilies.

Home Gardening Demonstration — The Artist’s Palette: Color in the Garden – 2 p.m.
Meet at the Conservatory Plaza

Join a Botanical Garden horticulturist for a journey through the color wheel. Discuss effective color combinations and have fun exploring the intricacies of floral forms—from leaves to flowers.

Salon Series: Monet to Mallarmé – 4 p.m.
In the Perennial Garden

Hear American poets reading the verse of their favorite French Symbolists, including Stephane Mallarmé, Arthur Rimbaud, and Paul Verlaine. They’ll then discuss the poet’s influence on their own work in this series, a part of Monet’s Garden. Co-presented by the Poetry Society of America. These programs are made possible by a gift from the Leon Lowenstein Foundation, Inc.

July 14: Baudelaire – Richard Howard, Rowan Ricardo Phillips, and Nancy Milford


Sunday, July 15

Conservatory Tour: Secrets of This Victorian Glasshouse – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Explore the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, an acre of plants under glass, with one of the Garden’s docents. Take an ecotour around the world through 11 distinct habitats, including two types of rain forest, deserts of the Americas and of Africa, and aquatic and carnivorous plant displays. Admission included with an All-Garden Pass.

Home Gardening Demonstration — The Artist’s Palette: Color in the Garden – 2 p.m.
Meet at the Conservatory Plaza

Join a Botanical Garden horticulturist for a journey through the color wheel. Discuss effective color combinations and have fun exploring the intricacies of floral forms—from leaves to flowers.

Monet’s Garden Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Join one of the Garden’s docents for a tour inside the galleries of the historic Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, where horticulturists of The New York Botanical Garden bring to life stunning re-creations of Monet’s most iconic gardens at Giverny. In the Conservatory Courtyard, the focus on the artistry of the great Impressionist continues with a display of water lilies.


Sunday: Family Dinner with Mario Batali Chefs — 5:30 to 8 p.m.

Special Ticket Required — In the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden

At the Garden, join some of Mario Batali’s finest chefs during one of only four al fresco Family Dinners–dining experiences for families in the NYBG’s Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden. Each dinner features a three-course, family-style menu designed by one of these talented chefs. Explore “Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens,” a robust and interactive space filled with beds of vegetables and herbs used in Mario’s restaurant kitchens; participate in hands-on gardening and craft activities; then sit back to enjoy live cooking demonstrations by Mario’s top chefs in the outdoor Whole Foods Market Family Garden Kitchen. Featured will be recipes with fresh, seasonal ingredients like those grown in “Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens.” The entire family is sure to enjoy this special evening together. Family Garden programming is geared for kids ages four to 12, while dinner will be paired with wine and a garden tea.

Chef appearances:
Casa Mono – Chef Anthony Sasso
Tarry Lodge – Chef Andy Nusser

First Course:
Summer Gazpacho
Leafy Green Italian Salad
Bagna Cauda with Just-Picked Root Vegetables

Second Course:
Grilled Ribeye and Dozen Herb Salsa Verde
Patatas Bravas
Escalivada with Romesco

Third Course:
Strawberries with Zabaglione and Aged Balsamico

Event Schedule:
5:15 p.m. — Trams begin departing from the Mosholu Gate
5:30 p.m. — Garden tours and activities begin
6:00 p.m. — Dinner courses served family style, demonstrations begin
8:00 p.m. — Evening concludes


Ongoing Children’s Programs

Summer Camp: Art in Nature
Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, July 9 through 13
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Children will be artists in the Garden throughout this camp. Each day will include time for drawing, painting, and creating sculptures. Children will embark on outdoor “creativity walks,” as well as design their own dance performances. Each day will be filled with outdoor explorations, hands-on activities, and creating art. The campers will show off their nature-inspired works of art during an art show at the end of the week.

Children’s Outdoor Nature Explorations: Observe and Create
Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, May 19 through September 30
Weekdays 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. / Weekends 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Let your inner Monet run wild and be inspired by nature to create art in all different forms. Movement, music, drawing and painting abound in this outdoor studio for children. Stop by Inspiration Station to play our outdoor marimba. Paint with water and experiment with colors in our Color Clash Studio. Step inside to experiment with the engineering behind aquatic plants. Nature is art–discover it at the Adventure Garden. Also on view: an exhibition by students from Studio in a School.

Hands-On Gardening Activities for Families: Sweet and Stinky
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, June 19 through July 27
Daily, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. (1:30 to 4:30 p.m. on July 15, July 26, August 2 and August 12)

Aromatic alliums and spicy herbs thrive in the summer heat. Follow the sweet and stinky smells to the Family Garden and discover these culinary champions. Savor the scents and tickle your taste buds with cooking demonstrations and samples, and become a green thumb by planting your very own herb to tend at home.
Cooking demonstrations at 2 and 4 p.m. on Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays.

The Edible Garden
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, July 1 through October 31
1:30 to 5:30 p.m. daily (1:30 to 5 p.m. on July 15, July 26, August 2 and August 12)

The Edible Garden returns to the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden this year, bringing plenty of events for both adults and kids alike with daily, family-friendly activities, cooking demonstrations in the Whole Foods Market Family Garden Kitchen, and hands-on gardening fun.

A Garden friend and chef extraordinaire, Mario Batali takes a featured role in this year’s Edible Garden. Visit the beds of herbs and vegetables in “Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens,” where you can pick up some of his favorite recipes. Later, join Mario and other top chefs for The Edible Garden Festival, featuring tastings, harvest activities, and a chance to sit down to dinner with the man himself. Your culinary delight begins in the garden! Visit summer through fall for the best of the harvest.

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Article source: http://www.nybg.org/plant-talk/2012/07/around-the-garden/this-weekend-verse-and-vegetables/

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