Earth Day Every Day: Planting the Seed of Conservation

Earth DayWhile it’s clear that every day is Earth Day at The New York Botanical Garden (look around!), we think of April 22 as another opportunity to break out our megaphone and remind the world that conservation and environmentalism are some of the most important concerns facing humanity today. But those are big, scary words to some people, and everyone could use some hints as to how they can best serve and better this planet we’ve been riding around on. That’s why, each year, we take part in hands-on activities that make it easy to learn greener, more sustainable means of supporting both yourself and our big blue-green orb.

If you’re out and about in the city today and feeling peckish, stop by one of Mario Batali’s gourmet restaurants for lunch or dinner and don’t forget to snag one of our seed packets on your way out. As always, our close pal Mario is dedicated to fresh, seasonal ingredients, and he’s paired up with us this year to provide these packets as part of our combined Edible Academy efforts. Each packet contains a healthy handful of Insalata Mista lettuce seeds ready to be sown at home, soon to save you a trip to the supermarket and provide healthy, delicious options for cooking at home. And if you can’t make it out to eat, we’ve also got a booth in Union Square for today only, giving out seed packets to anyone who’d like one!

Elsewhere in the city, keep your eyes peeled for Sprinkles Cupcakes. Our favorite buddies in the baked treats business are once again promoting charity on this special holiday by offering a portion of the proceeds from their Earth Day cupcakes to the NYBG’s Edible Academy and other worthy, environmentally-conscious organizations. How often do you get that kind of altruistic joy from something as delicious as a cupcake?

Here on Garden grounds we’re making the effort, too, with a day of afternoon Compost QAs, tree and Forest tours, hands-on wiggly worm fun in the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, and more. You can check out the full list here! Stop by if you’re in our neck of the woods and join us for some earthy appreciation—the weather’s pristine and it couldn’t be a better afternoon for being outdoors.

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/04/garden-programming/earth-day-every-day/

Related Posts:

Morning Eye Candy: Teensy

The tiny wonders just blooming in the Rock Garden get their own special beds, each one rounded off by dozens of cheering hellebores.

Rock Garden

In the Rock Garden – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/04/photography/morning-eye-candy-teensy/

Related Posts:

Connoisseurs and Cultivars at the Antique Garden Furniture Fair!

NYBG Antiques Garden Furniture Fair 2014The Antique Garden Furniture Fair is one of the most festive weekends at the Garden, and it is the country’s most renowned stage for authentic garden antiques and rarities. With more than 30 fine exhibitors offering antiques alongside our own Specialty Plant Sale, there is enough inventory and expertise in the Conservatory Tent and the Garden Room to help anybody bring their dream garden to life. Guiding you through the history of these remarkable treasures is a full series of programs scheduled throughout the Fair, running April 25 to 27. Read on for the full list of programs, as well as details regarding Friday’s Members Day!

On Friday’s special sneak peek for Members, those supporters visiting the Garden will enjoy free parking and other discounts during regular Garden hours. In honor of Gregory Long’s 25th anniversary as CEO and The William C. Steere Sr. President of the NYBG, Garden Members are invited to join him on April 25 from 9:45 to 10:45 a.m. in the Garden Terrace Room. Be sure to reserve seats in advance! A coffee and tea reception will be followed by reflections on the milestones of his distinguished tenure in a presentation entitled NYBG Then and Now: The President’s 25-Year Retrospective, detailing an era of restoration and revitalization that has transformed NYBG into one of the world’s most prominent cultural institutions.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

= 410 ? ’410px’ : ‘auto’);
}
]]>

The Garden Terrace Room will then be open to the public at 11 a.m. for the first talk of the weekend, Houses and Gardens: Their Intimate Relationship. Setting the tone for the Fair, the designer, author, and gardener Page Dickey will address the marriage of style and atmosphere between a house and its garden. Using imaginative examples around the country, she shows the importance of pathways and perspectives—axes from doorways, frameworks fashioned from hedges and lines of trees, terraces and walls—as unifying elements.

Page Dickey will then join several other authors at our Book Signers Fair. Some of the most accomplished names in garden writing, including a few of our own NYBG Adult Education instructors, will be present to answer questions and sign copies of their most recent works, covering topics from outdoor entertaining to ethnobotany!

The rest of the weekend is highlighted by a series of dedicated talks and QA sessions with our visiting vendors on a range of topics related to garden and interior design. Complete your appreciation of garden artwork with a visit to the Weird, Wild, Wonderful exhibition in the Ross Hall and admire the work of the most skilled botanical artists portraying some of nature’s most unusual specimens. Take your home or garden to the next level this year, either with a showstopping work of art, or one of the varieties of shrubs, trees, perennials, annuals, and herbs that will be available—including Japanese maples and Itoh peonies. With a little inspiration, the next big garden party could be your own!

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/04/garden-programming/connoisseurs-and-cultivars-at-the-antique-garden-furniture-fair/

Related Posts:

Morning Eye Candy: Forsooth, Forsythia!

Forsythia x intermedia

Forsythia × intermedia in the Benenson Ornamental Conifers – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/04/photography/morning-eye-candy-forsooth-forsythia/

Related Posts:

Morning Eye Candy: Architectural Sunglasses

We’re getting out ahead of the spring warmth. Time for the post-winter whitewash on the Conservatory dome!

Conservatory

Enid A. Haupt Conservatory – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/04/around-the-garden/morning-eye-candy-architectural-sunglasses/

Related Posts:

Yard-Long Beans

Sonia Uyterhoeven is the NYBG’s Gardener for Public Education.


Vigna unguiculata 'Red Noodle' (Photo by GardenBetty.com)

Vigna unguiculata ‘Red Noodle’
(Photo by GardenBetty.com)

What does a bean with a good imagination look like? If you’ve got the same tastes as Dr. Seuss then the ‘Red Noodle’ Bean or the ‘Yard-Long bean should be right up your alley. We have grown the former for several years in our vegetable garden, and usually just eat it straight off the vine—it’s so sweet and tasty. But it stays crunchier if you cook it, whether stir fried or steamed. Boiling, however, isn’t recommended—these beans get water-logged and tasteless.

‘Red Noodle’ (Vigna unguiculata) is, as the name suggests, a burgundy red color. What is exceptional about the bean (aside from its brilliant color) is that its average size is 18 inches long. It looks more like a jumbo Twizzler than anything you’d normally call a healthy bean. And, like most beans, the smaller, slender ones are the most tender—try to harvest when they are about 12 inches long and still slim.

Climbing tendrils of Vigna unguiculata

Climbing tendrils of Vigna unguiculata

Being a pole bean, ‘Red Noodle needs to be planted after all signs of the last frost have passed. It will scale up and wrap itself around any trellis or standing structure you give it. I generally give it a handsome bamboo teepee or an 8-foot-tall trellis.

If red is not your color, look for the green ‘Orient Wonder’. It is similar to ‘Red Noodle’ in stature, but tends to be a little slow to start in the early summer, so be patient and let it take its time to establish. ‘Red Noodle’ prefers warm, humid climates while ‘Orient Wonder’ can handle slightly cooler and drier climes.

Yard-long beans are sometimes referred to as asparagus beans. Here is a tasty recipe for ‘Red Noodle’ that I happened to find while floating around the internet.

Spicy Stir-Fried Red Noodle Beans with Peanuts

Ingredients:

·         1 bunch red noodle beans
·         1/2 cup unsalted dry-roasted peanuts
·         2 teaspoons soy sauce
·         2-3 small hot peppers or thai chiles
·         1/2 teaspoon salt
·         1 1/2 Tablespoons peanut oil
·         1 Tablespoons chopped garlic
·         one small onion very thinly sliced
·         2 tablespoons lime juice

Directions:

Cook red noodle beans in boiling salt water for 3-5 minutes or until tender. Transfer into a bowl of ice water to stop cooking, then drain and cut into 1-inch pieces.

Grind the peanuts in food processor until half are finely ground and the remainder are in large pieces. Stir together soy sauce, chilies, and salt in a small bowl.

Heat wok or skillet until oil is pretty hot, add garlic and stir-fry until golden, add peanuts and stir-fry about 30 more seconds. Add beans and onions and stir-fry about 2 minutes.

Remove wok from heat, stir in soy sauce, drizzle in lime juice and season with salt.

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/04/tip-of-the-week/yard-long-beans/

Related Posts:

This Weekend: Departing Key West, Beginning Earth Week

The Orchid Show Key West ContemporaryOn April 21, the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory ends its journey through the Florida Keys. This weekend is your last chance to enjoy the modernist pergolas and reflecting pools of landscape architect Raymond Jungles! There are also plenty of programs this weekend to maximize your visit to The Orchid Show: Key West Contemporary before it closes. Better yet, the Garden will also be open on Easter Sunday and Monday, April 21, for the final day of The Orchid Show.

While activity may be winding down in the Conservatory, the party is just getting started on grounds. Spring was difficult to think of during the long winter, but now the magnolias, daffodils, and cherry blossoms are returning the Garden to its due brilliance. In advance of Earth Day at the Garden on Tuesday, visitors are invited to kick off Earth Week at Sunday’s Terrace Talk! This Science Program will include a special botany-inspired cocktail tasting, and an exciting look into the work of the Pfizer Lab. If you missed out on Orchid Evenings, this is your chance to enjoy the the Garden in style while getting an exclusive peek at its inner workings.

The Culinary Kids Food Festival also ends April 21, so this weekend is the perfect time to bring the kids on a delicious journey! Read on for the rest of this weekend’s activities at the Garden!


Saturday, April 19

Purple Flowers

Roaming Orchid Guides – 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
Meet in the Palm Dome of the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Garden guides highlight parts of the permanent collection and special exhibition to add insight to your experience of The Orchid Show. They will provide an in-depth look at rare and extraordinary orchid specimens on display.

Bird Walk – 11 a.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center

The diverse habitats of the Botanical Garden offer visitors a chance to see dozens of species of birds throughout the year. Bring your binoculars and walk the Garden grounds with an expert to learn about bird-friendly habitats, migrating species, and birds that make a permanent home at the Garden.

Garden Highlights: Spring Awakening Tour with ASL Interpreter – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center

Sights and scents emerge across the 250-acres of the Botanical Garden. Join a Garden Guide for a walking tour featuring highlights of the gardens and plant collections, like the Native Plant and Perennial Gardens.

Escape to Paradise: The Music of Key West – 1 3 p.m.
In the Ross Hall

The sounds of tropical rock and island music transport you to Key West with lyrics that evoke a warm, lush locale and a laid-back lifestyle, plus rhythms of the acoustic guitar, congas, and percussion instruments.

About the Band: Jimmy Kenny and The Pirate Beach Band‘s musicians have over 20 years of live playing experience. They pride themselves on bringing the most authentic listening experience possible in a tribute to the music of Jimmy Buffett, Kenny Chesney and the Zac Brown Band among others, including your favorite tropical hits, reggae, Top 40 Americana, and the best in New and Classic Country.

Orchid Care QA – 1:30–4:30 p.m.
In Shop in the Garden

Gardening and orchid experts share their best secrets and explain the simple steps to healthy plants as they help you choose the right plant for your home.

Orchid Care Demonstrations: Orchid Bonanza – 2 3 p.m.
In the Conservatory GreenSchool

Join us for the final weekend of The Orchid Show. Be guided through the basics of orchid care and some of the best varieties to grow at home.

Nature Journaling in the Native Plant Garden Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center

Enjoy a mosaic of nearly 100,000 native trees, wildflowers, ferns and grasses designed to flourish in every season through the lens of a naturalist. Participants will practice nature journaling techniques through inquiry, observation and other hands-on activities.

Orchid Evenings – 7–9 p.m.
In the Conservatory

Tomorrow’s Orchid Evening is SOLD OUT! On Saturday guests will say goodbye to this special exhibition with a cocktail in hand. Music and unforgettable beauty make for one of New York City’s most romantic date destinations. Your ticket includes a complimentary cocktail and special dinner offers at our restaurant partners on Little Italy’s Arthur Avenue and beyond. DJ Julio Pezua is spinning tunes for the event. More details below:

Cocktail Partner: The Yvette Cup will be on offer, courtesy of Cooper Spirits. This is a perfect fruity, herbal, and botanical blend of a cocktail. Ginger, cucumber, and mint are muddled and topped off with gin and Crème Yvette and a squeeze of lime.

Non-Member $30/Member $20 (Adults 21 and over) Advance tickets recommended; includes one specialty cocktail.
Select tickets are still available to the champagne pre-party at Shop in the Garden from 6 to 7 p.m. Learn more at priceless.com/newyork.


Sunday, April 20

Magnolia Tree LuEsther T Mertz Library

Roaming Orchid Guides – 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
Meet in the Palm Dome of the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Garden guides highlight parts of the permanent collection and special exhibition to add insight to your experience of The Orchid Show. They will provide an in-depth look at rare and extraordinary orchid specimens on display.

Ross Conifer Arboretum Tour – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center

The Arthur and Janet Ross Conifer Arboretum is a historic, 15-acre collection of towering pines, elegant spruces, and mountain firs from around the world. These irreplaceable trees were among the first planted at the Garden, some as far back as the early 1900s. Join an expertly trained Guide for a tour of these exquisite specimens.

Escape to Paradise: The Music of Key West – 1 3:30 p.m.
In the Ross Hall

The sounds of tropical rock and island music transport you to Key West with lyrics that evoke a warm, lush locale and a laid-back lifestyle, plus rhythms of the acoustic guitar, congas, and percussion instruments.

About the Band: Jimmy Kenny and The Pirate Beach Band‘s musicians have over 20 years of live playing experience. They pride themselves on bringing the most authentic listening experience possible in a tribute to the music of Jimmy Buffett, Kenny Chesney and the Zac Brown Band among others, including your favorite tropical hits, reggae, Top 40 Americana, and the best in New and Classic Country.

Orchid Care QA – 1:30–4:30 p.m.
In Shop in the Garden

Gardening and orchid experts share their best secrets and explain the simple steps to healthy plants as they help you choose the right plant for your home.

Orchid Care Demonstrations: Orchid Bonanza – 2 3 p.m.
In the Conservatory GreenSchool

Join us for the final weekend of The Orchid Show. Be guided through the basics of orchid care and some of the best varieties to grow at home.

Science Program: Terrace Talk – 2–3:30 p.m.
At the Pfizer Lab Terrace

Welcome spring and celebrate Earth Week with our science staff, enjoying refreshments and a view of the early blooms around Twin Lakes and find out how nature knows to wake up. Learn more about the research and discovery that the Garden’s science team undertakes.

The cocktail tasting features Shoots Roots Bitters, created by a team of botanists on a quest to capture the most delicious, healthful, and intriguing properties of underutilized plants through botanical infusions to elevate your drinks and meals. Learn about conservation issues and solutions that come to be through the promotion of underutilized plants in food and beverages. Guests will also be able to take a brief tour through the Pfizer Lab to learn the scientific process involved in studying the phytochemical and genetic profiles of plants.

Native Plant Garden Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center

Join a tour guide for an insider’s view of the newly designed Native Plant Garden. Enjoy a mosaic of nearly 100,000 native trees, wildflowers, ferns and grasses designed to flourish in every season.


Ongoing Children’s Programs

Everett Childrens Adventure Garden

Culinary Kids Food Festival – 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

As part of the Garden’s Edible Academy initiative, join us for a family-friendly, weeklong food festival celebrating the relationships among plants, farms, and your favorite foods. Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden staff and the culinary team, Growing Chefs, will be on hand offering cooking demonstrations, recipes, and hands-on activities, with plenty of music and tastings to add to the fun. Bring your Festival passport along as you tinker with the science of kitchen chemistry and get to the root of foods from honey to sprouts at a variety of activity stations. The daily 1 p.m. cooking demonstration will feature kid-friendly recipes and tasty samples, while local chefs will share tips and recipes.

Little Landscapes – 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
In the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden

The plant world comes alive in a big way at the Discovery Center this winter. Take a step inside the world of plants and create your own terrarium to bring home. Be inspired to create a rocky, mossy, or floral world in a jar by looking closely at a wide array of artistic and scientific terrariums. While you are at it, use a microscope to take a closer look at some of the featured terrarium characters like moss, lichens, and rocks.

Dig! Plant! Grow!: Wild, Wiggly Worms – 1:30–5:30 p.m.
In the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden

Rise and shine Family Garden! Help get the garden off to a good start by sowing seeds, planting seedlings, spreading compost, and digging. Observe the rapid changes and new growth on the trees, shrubs, and bulbs in our meadow, and explore germination of seeds up close with microscopes and magnifiers.

Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens – 1:30 – 6 p.m.
In the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden

Kids can explore with Mario’s Menu Mystery game, featuring favorite vegetables and herbs from nine of his restaurants’ kitchens, including Otto and Del Posto.

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/04/garden-programming/this-weekend-departing-key-west-beginning-earth-week/

Related Posts:

Marvelous Magnolias

Jaime Morin is The New York Botanical Garden’s Assistant Curator in horticulture. She works with the plant records and curation teams to help keep the garden’s information on its living collections up to date. She also oversees the details of the garden’s Living Collections Phenology Project.


Magnolia stellata 'Waterlily'

Magnolia stellata ‘Waterlily’

Late last week I brought a group of new Living Collections Phenology volunteers through the magnolia and oak collections just as the plants began hinting at spring. Of the earliest flowering species, the star magnolias (Magnolia stellata) were beginning to show off their crisp white flowers and the rarer Zen’s magnolia (Magnolia zenii) was in full flower, showing gorgeous pink watercolor streaks at the base of its tepals.

This week the magnolias are really strutting their stuff at The New York Botanical Garden. It is amazing how much things can change over the weekend! By this Monday the many saucer magnolias (Magnolia × soulangeana) in the collection were revealing their newly opened flowers and they continue to get prettier by the day.

Though you can’t go wrong with any of the magnolias here at the Garden, my favorite plant is one of the kobus magnolias (Magnolia kobus). We have a fantastic specimen just north of the Visitor Center that I believe is unparalleled across our 250 acres. This particular plant, accessioned in 1940, is over 35 feet tall and 45 feet wide. Its fragrant white flowers cover its branches like thousands of small white song birds about to take flight.

I don’t just adore magnolias for their flowers, though. Even if you miss this initial show, their fruit is also fascinating. Magnolias create lumpy, club-like aggregate pods that eventually open to reveal fatty, brightly-colored seed structures that attract a variety of songbirds and plant lovers alike.

Magnolia kobus

Magnolia kobus

For the home gardener, most magnolias flower best if given full sun or light shade. They also tend to enjoy somewhere sheltered from harsh wind and appreciate moist, well-drained, slightly acidic soil. There are many different species and cultivars to choose from, so be sure to do some research before planting one at home. They can vary greatly in size, color, and form. Some are evergreen, some lose their leaves during winter, and some (like Magnolia virginiana) can waffle in between the two depending on the winter!

If you are a magnolia admirer, be sure to explore the old magnolia collection near Twin Lakes, as well as the many wonderful specimens we have dotted across the landscape.

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/04/horticulture-2/marvelous-magnolias/

Related Posts:

Morning Eye Candy: Plum Delightful

Prunus cerasifera var. divaricata

Myrobalan plum (Prunus cerasifera var. divaricata) near the Mosholu Gate – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/04/photography/morning-eye-candy-plum-delightful/

Related Posts:

Morning Eye Candy: Proof

They’re minute but resolute, those small green things that join together to build the season.

Spring in the South Arboretum

In the South Arboretum – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/04/photography/morning-eye-candy-proof/

Related Posts: