Morning Eye Candy: Vividly Violet

Vernonia noveboracensis

New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) along the Mitsubishi Wetland Trail – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/08/photography/morning-eye-candy-vividly-violet/

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Art of the Heirloom

Penstemon digitalisAdult Education is going to seed—but in a good way!

The new Fall-Winter course catalog showcases NYBG’s collaboration with Hudson Valley Seed Library, a farm-based company devoted to heirloom and open-pollinated seeds and garden-themed contemporary art. Every year, Hudson Valley Seed Library commissions unique, original artworks for its annual seed catalog—and this year a special NYBG seed pack coincides with the upcoming Art of the Heirloom exhibit. The Adult Education catalog features the Garden’s seed pack on the cover, with art from the exhibition included throughout.

On the cover, a wreath of Penstemon digitalis—a perennial native to New York also known as foxglove beardtongue—surrounds the iconic Enid A. Haupt Conservatory.

“We were looking for something that was native, easy to grow, and adaptable,” said Kristin Schleiter, Associate Vice President for Outdoor Gardens and Senior Curator. “It takes to sun or part shade; conditions range from average to pretty dry, it blooms a very long time, and it’s a really reliable plant.” Of course, she added, it’s also beautiful, starting to bloom “at a time when there’s not a lot else going on, so it’s a great addition to gardens.”

Like the other packs from the Hudson Valley Seed Library, the Garden’s seed pack celebrates genetic, cultural, and artistic diversity. Art of the Heirloom, an annual traveling exhibition now in its sixth year, highlights this delightful intersection of art and the garden. The elegant and witty collection features artists who range from the up-and-coming to the world-renowned, working in watercolor, collage, oil, letterpress, embroidery, and more.

Penstemon digitalis

Penstemon digitalis

Art of the Heirloom will be on exhibit in the Ross Gallery from November 15, 2014 to January 19, 2015. And on January 16, don’t miss the special lecture and gallery walk led by Ken Greene, Hudson Valley Seed Library founder and a tireless advocate for seed diversity.

Just as every seed plants a story, every class you take at NYBG plants a seed of learning and discovery. To browse and register for Fall-Winter classes, visit nybg.org/adulted

The New York Botanical Garden Penstemon digitalis seed pack is available at Shop in the Garden starting in November.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/08/adult-education/art-of-the-heirloom/

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This Weekend: A Labor Day Lark

The NYBG WeekendAs one of the last gasps of summer, Labor Day weekend is a chance for NYBG to throw open its gates on a Monday and welcome everyone for what tends to be the closing week of our summer exhibition. And this year, things are no different—we’re rapidly approaching the September 7 end of our Groundbreakers exhibition! If you haven’t found a moment to get away and visit us here in the Bronx, now’s as good a time as any and maybe even better.

Those of you with kids in tow will be happy to know that we’re going full-tilt in the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden with our SousaKazooza events, the last of the season. Bring your little ones for some music, marching, and crafts to keep them busy. And for the adults, we’re still offering our full suite of Groundbreakers events alongside a sweeping schedule of tours—Azalea Garden, Rock Garden, Conservatory, Native Plant Garden and Garden Highlights among them—to help you make the most of your afternoon.

Head past the jump for the full schedule, and don’t let the last few weeks of warm sunshine get away from you!


Saturday, August 30

The NYBG Weekend

Rock Garden Tour – 11:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
The Rock Garden is a 2 1/2-acre oasis complete with a pond and waterfall and featuring alpine plants from six continents. Join an expertly trained Garden Guide for a walking tour to see and learn more about these jewel-like plants.

Family Adventures: SousaKazooza! – 12–4 p.m.
In the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden
Ongoing craft, 12-4 p.m.
Presentations with parades, 12, 1, 2, 3 p.m.
Kids learn about John Philip Sousa and two of America’s distinct instruments, the sousaphone and kazoo. Participants make bandleader hats and receive a kazoo with which to march around. On Labor Day, September 1, participants are encouraged to come back and take part in a performance in the Ross Hall, for families and friends!

Native Plant Garden Tour – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Join a tour guide for an insider’s view of the newly designed Native Plant Garden. Enjoy a mosaic of nearly 100,000 native trees, wildflowers, ferns and grasses designed to flourish in every season.

From Ragtime to Jazz: The Roots of Pop – 1 3:30 p.m.
In the Ross Hall
Music from the period of Groundbreakers—ragtime, jazz, Broadway, and beyond to Hollywood—had a great impact on American culture. Enjoy a variery of styles in live performances by a trio of artists, including musical producer, pianist, and historian Terry Waldo, featuring the works of Scott Joplin, Eubie Blake, Irving Berlin, and Tin Pan Alley composers such as George Gershwin, George M. Cohan, and Dorothy Fields.

Garden Highlights Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Sights and scents flourish across the 250 acres of the Botanical Garden. Join a Garden Guide for a walking tour featuring highlights of the gardens and plant collections.


Sunday, August 31

The NYBG Weekend

Family Adventures: SousaKazooza! – 12–4 p.m.
In the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden
Ongoing craft, 12-4 p.m.
Presentations with parades, 12, 1, 2, 3 p.m.
Kids learn about John Philip Sousa and two of America’s distinct instruments, the sousaphone and kazoo. Participants make bandleader hats and receive a kazoo with which to march around. On Labor Day, September 1, participants are encouraged to come back and take part in a performance in the Ross Hall, for families and friends!

Garden Highlights Tour – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Sights and scents flourish across the 250 acres of the Botanical Garden. Join a Garden Guide for a walking tour featuring highlights of the gardens and plant collections.

From Ragtime to Jazz: The Roots of Pop – 1 3:30 p.m.
In the Ross Hall
Music from the period of Groundbreakers—ragtime, jazz, Broadway, and beyond to Hollywood—had a great impact on American culture. Enjoy a variery of styles in live performances by a trio of artists, including musical producer, pianist, and historian Terry Waldo, featuring the works of Scott Joplin, Eubie Blake, Irving Berlin, and Tin Pan Alley composers such as George Gershwin, George M. Cohan, and Dorothy Fields.

Conservatory Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory
Explore the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, an acre of plants under glass, with one of the Garden’s Guides. Take an ecotour around the world through 11 distinct habitats, including two types of rain forest, deserts of the Americas and of Africa, and aquatic and carnivorous plant displays.


Monday, September 1

The NYBG Weekend

Azalea Garden Tour – 11 a.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Join us for a guided tour of the 11-acre site that offers an encyclopedic collection of the world’s azaleas planted along a broad hillside punctuated by rock outcrops and shaded by mature native trees.

Family Adventures: SousaKazooza! – 12–4 p.m.
In the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden
Ongoing craft, 12-4 p.m.
Presentations with parades, 12, 1, 2, 3 p.m.
Kids learn about John Philip Sousa and two of America’s distinct instruments, the sousaphone and kazoo. Participants make bandleader hats and receive a kazoo with which to march around.

Native Plant Garden Tour – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Join a tour guide for an insider’s view of the newly designed Native Plant Garden. Enjoy a mosaic of nearly 100,000 native trees, wildflowers, ferns and grasses designed to flourish in every season.

From Ragtime to Jazz: The Roots of Pop – 1 3:30 p.m.
In the Ross Hall
Music from the period of Groundbreakers—ragtime, jazz, Broadway, and beyond to Hollywood—had a great impact on American culture. Enjoy a variery of styles in live performances by a trio of artists, including musical producer, pianist, and historian Terry Waldo, featuring the works of Scott Joplin, Eubie Blake, Irving Berlin, and Tin Pan Alley composers such as George Gershwin, George M. Cohan, and Dorothy Fields.

Rock Garden Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
TheRock Garden is a 2.5-acre oasis complete with a pond and waterfall and featuring alpine plants from six continents. Join an expertly trained Garden Guide for a walking tour to see and learn more about these jewel-like plants.

Family Adventures: SousaPalooza! – 3:30 p.m.
In the Ross Hall
Bring your kazoos and marching band hats! Children who have participated in SousaKazooza are invited to participate in a final presentation of their musical studies during the 3:30 p.m. performance of From Ragtime to Jazz: The Roots of Pop. Children will have the opportunity to perform on stage with professional musicians of The Terry Waldo Trio and show off their newly learned skills on the kazoo.


Ongoing Children’s Programs

The NYBG Weekend

Family Adventures: Focusing on Nature
In the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden
Weekdays; 1:30–5:30 p.m.

Weekends plus Holiday Mondays; 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Children will explore the art of garden photography and will even have the opportunity to become garden photographers themselves. Through a series of stops within the Garden, they will see the world through a new lens as they learn how observations in science and nature have been recorded throughout time. They will also receive tips about perspective, scale, and framing when taking photographs.

Dig, Plant, Grow: Pollinator Palls: Bees and Butterflies
August 19–October 3
In the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden
The Family Garden is buzzing in late summer! Join us to learn about important pollinators: our honeybees and the monarch butterflies passing us by on their way to Mexico.

Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens – 1:30 p.m. – 6 p.m.
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden
Kids can explore with Mario’s Menu Mystery game, featuring favorite vegetables and herbs from nine of his restaurants’ kitchens, including Otto and Del Posto.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/08/around-the-garden/this-weekend-a-labor-day-lark/

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Morning Eye Candy: Moonlighting

Looks like Groundbreakers‘ moon gate is moonlighting on the Bronx River. We’re almost into the very last week of our summer exhibition, so if you haven’t found the opportunity to pay us a visit, now’s a great time!

Bronx River

Along the Bronx River in the Thain Family Forest – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/08/photography/morning-eye-candy-moonlighting/

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Morning Eye Candy: Moonlighting

Looks like Groundbreakers‘ moon gate is moonlighting on the Bronx River. We’re almost into the very last week of our summer exhibition, so if you haven’t found the opportunity to pay us a visit, now’s a great time!

Bronx River

Along the Bronx River in the Thain Family Forest – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/08/photography/morning-eye-candy-moonlighting/

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This Week at the Greenmarket: Bright & Robust

Tomato Today’s Greenmarket includes tomatoes of all sizes and onions of every shade, plus kale, sweet chard, leeks, fresh garlic, and more!

Leeks have a very special flavor without being overpowering. Click through for a bit of seasonal inspiration in a simple, savory pasta recipe—fusili with creamed leek and spinach. Try it out over the long weekend!

Be sure to visit the upcoming schedule for future special programs, demos, and QAs at the Wednesday Greenmarket. Now that summer is winding down, be sure to look at GrowNYC’s calendar of what’s in season and explore some future possibilities for exciting fall meals.


fusili with creamed lek and spinach  Quentin Bacon

Photo by Quentin Bacon

Fusilli with Creamed Leek and Spinach
Via Food Wine

Ingredients

3/4 pound(s) fusilli
1 1/2 tablespoon(s) extra-virgin olive oil
1 large leek, white and light green parts only thinly sliced
1 cup(s) heavy cream
4 cup(s) packed baby spinach, 4 ounces coarsely chopped
1/2 cup(s) lightly packed basil leaves, finely chopped
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Preparation

  1. In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook the fusilli until al dente, then drain.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large, deep skillet, heat the olive oil. Add the leek and cook over moderate heat until softened, about 10 minutes. Add the cream and simmer over moderate heat until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Add the spinach and cook until wilted, about 2 minutes.
  3. Add the cooked fusilli to the skillet and toss over moderately low heat until coated with the leek sauce, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat, add the chopped basil and toss. Season with salt and pepper. Spoon the fusilli into bowls and serve.

Our weekly cooking demonstrations continue today, and you can find assistance with enrolling in the New York State of Health Marketplace from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Greenmarket accepts food stamps, EBT, WIC/FMNP, and Senior coupons, in addition to cash and credit or debit cards.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/08/garden-programming/this-week-at-the-greenmarket-bright-robust/

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This Week at the Greenmarket: Bright & Robust

Tomato Today’s Greenmarket includes tomatoes of all sizes and onions of every shade, plus kale, sweet chard, leeks, fresh garlic, and more!

Leeks have a very special flavor without being overpowering. Click through for a bit of seasonal inspiration in a simple, savory pasta recipe—fusili with creamed leek and spinach. Try it out over the long weekend!

Be sure to visit the upcoming schedule for future special programs, demos, and QAs at the Wednesday Greenmarket. Now that summer is winding down, be sure to look at GrowNYC’s calendar of what’s in season and explore some future possibilities for exciting fall meals.


fusili with creamed lek and spinach  Quentin Bacon

Photo by Quentin Bacon

Fusilli with Creamed Leek and Spinach
Via Food Wine

Ingredients

3/4 pound(s) fusilli
1 1/2 tablespoon(s) extra-virgin olive oil
1 large leek, white and light green parts only thinly sliced
1 cup(s) heavy cream
4 cup(s) packed baby spinach, 4 ounces coarsely chopped
1/2 cup(s) lightly packed basil leaves, finely chopped
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Preparation

  1. In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook the fusilli until al dente, then drain.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large, deep skillet, heat the olive oil. Add the leek and cook over moderate heat until softened, about 10 minutes. Add the cream and simmer over moderate heat until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Add the spinach and cook until wilted, about 2 minutes.
  3. Add the cooked fusilli to the skillet and toss over moderately low heat until coated with the leek sauce, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat, add the chopped basil and toss. Season with salt and pepper. Spoon the fusilli into bowls and serve.

Our weekly cooking demonstrations continue today, and you can find assistance with enrolling in the New York State of Health Marketplace from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Greenmarket accepts food stamps, EBT, WIC/FMNP, and Senior coupons, in addition to cash and credit or debit cards.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/08/garden-programming/this-week-at-the-greenmarket-bright-robust/

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An Urban Farm Flourishes on the Grand Concourse

Ursula Chanse is the Director of Bronx Green-Up and Community Horticulture and Project Director for NYC Compost Project, hosted by The New York Botanical Garden. For more information about these programs and upcoming workshops and events, visit Bronx Green-Up.


New Roots Community GardenOn a sun-baked day in July 2012, we stood outside a new vacant lot, completely sterile and void of any plant or animal life, but there was an urban farm to come…

The International Rescue Committee (IRC), an organization that provides critical services to refugees and asylees, had signed a lease with the NYC Department of Transportation, envisioning a new community farm to support their clients and also benefit the surrounding community. They asked for the help of our program, Bronx Green-Up, the Garden’s community gardening outreach program which has helped create community gardens, school gardens, and urban farms in the Bronx for more than 25 years.

There was promise from the start. On one early visit I bent down to pick up a plastic bottle near the entrance when I noticed a small piece of paper tucked inside—surely, it couldn’t be a message—but yes, the words asked if we were starting a garden, and stated that the person would be interested in helping out.

After that, the IRC and Bronx Green-Up made community workdays available to the public, and steadily passersby stopped in, interested and often willing to lend a hand. Job training programs from Sustainable South Bronx, Osborne Association, and NY Horticulture Society all contributed. Students from FarmSchool NYC gave design and season extension ideas as part of their urban agriculture training. School groups have also played an important role, including the adjacent schools, KIPP Academy and Cardinal Hayes High School. Countless volunteers through NY Cares, our Bronx Green-Up program, neighbors and others have all been part of community workdays. NYC Compost Project hosted by The New York Botanical Garden lent composting expertise and the citywide program funded and managed by the NYC Department of Sanitation brought loads of free compost. Organizations including GreenThumb of NYC Parks as well as garden designer and Botanical Garden Board Member Edie Kean have also made valuable contributions.

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Today, after the efforts of so many, the New Roots Community Farm at the corner of East 153rd Street and Grand Concourse is brimming with life. Honeybees (two hives are now onsite) are busy gathering nectar and pollen, while various butterflies—including painted ladies, black swallowtails, and red admirals—have been seen gliding and feeding on the site. Dragonflies have also passed through and wasps, bumble bees, and many other beneficial insects are now making their home here.

Since the site is set on a steep slope, we built two bioswales and a rain garden to absorb as much rainfall as possible. In addition to slowing erosion, managing stormwater run-off is such an important issue that we wanted to implement green infrastructure techniques to limit the flow of stormwater into NYC’s waterways. The swales, planted mostly with excess native plants from the Garden’s Native Plant Garden opening last year, boast mountain mint, Emory’s sedge, soft rush, blazing star, great blue lobelia, cup flower, milkweeds, and Echinacea. The rain garden is filled with cutleaf coneflower, iris, common boneset, bee balm, tussock sedge, and tufted hair grass.

Food crops now fill the raised beds on site, overflowing with tomatoes, kale, watermelons, hot and sweet peppers, basil, eggplants, and bush beans among many others. Fruit trees, including cherries, figs, persimmons, pomegranates, and serviceberries have been planted.

New Roots Community GardenIRC’s English classes visit the site regularly and IRC clients and community members tend their plots, while market beds are tended by IRC staff and community volunteers, providing fresh bounty to be distributed to arriving refugee families or brought to a community-run farmer’s market.

Next time you are on the Grand Concourse, be sure to take a peek at all the activity, or perhaps catch a ride on the September 6 Bronx Food and Farm Tour which ends at New Roots Community Farm and the location of this year’s annual Harvest Fair, which will feature BombaYo, fresh food from New Roots, an observation bee hive, harvest contests, and children’s activities.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/08/learning/an-urban-farm-flourishes-on-the-grand-concourse/

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An Urban Farm Flourishes on the Grand Concourse

Ursula Chanse is the Director of Bronx Green-Up and Community Horticulture and Project Director for NYC Compost Project, hosted by The New York Botanical Garden. For more information about these programs and upcoming workshops and events, visit Bronx Green-Up.


New Roots Community GardenOn a sun-baked day in July 2012, we stood outside a new vacant lot, completely sterile and void of any plant or animal life, but there was an urban farm to come…

The International Rescue Committee (IRC), an organization that provides critical services to refugees and asylees, had signed a lease with the NYC Department of Transportation, envisioning a new community farm to support their clients and also benefit the surrounding community. They asked for the help of our program, Bronx Green-Up, the Garden’s community gardening outreach program which has helped create community gardens, school gardens, and urban farms in the Bronx for more than 25 years.

There was promise from the start. On one early visit I bent down to pick up a plastic bottle near the entrance when I noticed a small piece of paper tucked inside—surely, it couldn’t be a message—but yes, the words asked if we were starting a garden, and stated that the person would be interested in helping out.

After that, the IRC and Bronx Green-Up made community workdays available to the public, and steadily passersby stopped in, interested and often willing to lend a hand. Job training programs from Sustainable South Bronx, Osborne Association, and NY Horticulture Society all contributed. Students from FarmSchool NYC gave design and season extension ideas as part of their urban agriculture training. School groups have also played an important role, including the adjacent schools, KIPP Academy and Cardinal Hayes High School. Countless volunteers through NY Cares, our Bronx Green-Up program, neighbors and others have all been part of community workdays. NYC Compost Project hosted by The New York Botanical Garden lent composting expertise and the citywide program funded and managed by the NYC Department of Sanitation brought loads of free compost. Organizations including GreenThumb of NYC Parks as well as garden designer and Botanical Garden Board Member Edie Kean have also made valuable contributions.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

= 410 ? ’410px’ : ‘auto’);
}
]]>

Today, after the efforts of so many, the New Roots Community Farm at the corner of East 153rd Street and Grand Concourse is brimming with life. Honeybees (two hives are now onsite) are busy gathering nectar and pollen, while various butterflies—including painted ladies, black swallowtails, and red admirals—have been seen gliding and feeding on the site. Dragonflies have also passed through and wasps, bumble bees, and many other beneficial insects are now making their home here.

Since the site is set on a steep slope, we built two bioswales and a rain garden to absorb as much rainfall as possible. In addition to slowing erosion, managing stormwater run-off is such an important issue that we wanted to implement green infrastructure techniques to limit the flow of stormwater into NYC’s waterways. The swales, planted mostly with excess native plants from the Garden’s Native Plant Garden opening last year, boast mountain mint, Emory’s sedge, soft rush, blazing star, great blue lobelia, cup flower, milkweeds, and Echinacea. The rain garden is filled with cutleaf coneflower, iris, common boneset, bee balm, tussock sedge, and tufted hair grass.

Food crops now fill the raised beds on site, overflowing with tomatoes, kale, watermelons, hot and sweet peppers, basil, eggplants, and bush beans among many others. Fruit trees, including cherries, figs, persimmons, pomegranates, and serviceberries have been planted.

New Roots Community GardenIRC’s English classes visit the site regularly and IRC clients and community members tend their plots, while market beds are tended by IRC staff and community volunteers, providing fresh bounty to be distributed to arriving refugee families or brought to a community-run farmer’s market.

Next time you are on the Grand Concourse, be sure to take a peek at all the activity, or perhaps catch a ride on the September 6 Bronx Food and Farm Tour which ends at New Roots Community Farm and the location of this year’s annual Harvest Fair, which will feature BombaYo, fresh food from New Roots, an observation bee hive, harvest contests, and children’s activities.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/08/learning/an-urban-farm-flourishes-on-the-grand-concourse/

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Morning Eye Candy: Sugar Fix

Take it from this little hummingbird— the key to taking on Monday is an energizing breakfast!

0814-MEC-hummingbird-perennial-600x900

In the Perennial Garden – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

 

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