Morning Eye Candy: A Squirrel’s Feast

Quercus coccinea scarlet oak
Quercus coccinea in the Ross Conifer Arboretum – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/09/photography/morning-eye-candy-a-squirrels-feast/

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Morning Eye Candy: Over the River and Through the Woods

You won’t find grandma’s house in the Thain Family Forest (hopefully), but there is still a green freshness to enjoy under the canopy before the fall colors completely taken hold just yet. We will keep you updated on the changing leaves as we get closer to Fall Forest Weekends in November.
Thain Family Forest

In the Thain Family Forest – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/09/photography/morning-eye-candy-into-the-woods/

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Morning Eye Candy: Autumn Fragrance

The fragrant blooms are just beginning to appear in the purple-leaved Kamchatka bugbane.

prplue leaved Kamchatka bugbane actaea simplex James Compton Seasonal Walk

Actaea simplex ‘James Compton’ in Seasonal Walk – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/09/photography/morning-eye-candy-autumn-fragrance/

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Morning Eye Candy: Tree-chitecture

The agiri tree’s structures are visually fascinating from any angle.

igiri tree Idesia polycarpaIdesia polycarpa in the Ross Conifer Arboretum – Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/09/photography/morning-eye-candy-tree-chitecture/

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Morning Eye Candy: Bountiful Berries

The American cranberry bush is bearing fruit!

Viburnum opulus var. americanum 'Wentworth' American cranberry bush

Viburnum opulus var. americanum ‘Wentworth’ in the Ross Conifer Arboretum – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/09/photography/morning-eye-candy-bountiful-berries/

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Cover Crops: Sowing Seeds for the Soil

Ursula Chanse is the Director of Bronx Green-Up and Community Horticulture and Project Director for NYC Compost Project, hosted by The New York Botanical Garden. For more information about these programs and upcoming workshops and events, visit Bronx Green-Up.


Recently, on a sunny Saturday at Taqwa Community Farm in the Highbridge neighborhood of the Bronx, just up the hill from Yankee Stadium, we worked with Farm School NYC students (a program of Just Food) to prepare several areas for planting and sowing cover crops.

Bronx Green Up Taqwa Community Garden Highbridge Bronx Tamara Bogolasky

Photo by Tamara Bogolasky

As we head steadily into fall, many of our warm season vegetable crops have slowed down, and at Bronx Green-Up, we start encouraging the use of fall cover crops in the community gardens, school gardens, and urban farms in the Bronx. Cover crops, also known as green manures, are not grown to feed the gardeners, but rather to nourish the soil. They are perfect to sow after pulling out your tomatoes, peppers, corn, and beans.

Cover crops have many benefits, including protecting soil from erosion, increasing organic matter, adding nitrogen, suppressing weeds, and improving soil structure and aeration.
Winter rye and hairy vetch are two fall cover crops we have promoted over the years. Winter rye (Secale cereale) will keep growing when temperatures are over 38° F. It requires little moisture and retains its green color, even in the dead of winter. I’ve often appreciated its greenness on one of those bleak winter days.

Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa) is a hardy winter legume that decomposes rapidly when incorporated into the soil. It is a great companion to winter rye as hairy vetch is a vine that does best when it can grow along the structure of another plant. This allows good light and air circulation, promoting the growth of the vetch. Rye also has a fibrous root system that binds with the soil, while vetch’s tap root houses the nitrogen-fixing bacteria, pulls nutrients from deep in the soil, and creates passages for drainage. Finally, when turned under in early spring, the nitrogen-rich vetch assists with breaking down the carbon-rich rye. After being left to breakdown for two to three weeks, the area will be perfect for planting your spring crops.

Bronx Green Up Taqwa Community Garden Bronx NYBG

Taqwa Community Farm

As Farm School students broadcasted the seed and covered the areas with row cover to protect from birds and squirrels, the weekly farmers’ market brought in neighbors who selected their fresh fruits and vegetables. A resource to the local neighborhood as well as visitors citywide, students commuted from across the city this September for hands-on learning and to make a contribution to the workings of this community farm.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/09/learning/cover-crops-sowing-seeds-for-the-soil/

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This Weekend: Fall Fun at the Harvest Festival!

bee pollinator home gardening center flowerKick off fall with NYBG this weekend at the Harvest Festival! Two days of music and activities will fill the Garden grounds to benefit the Edible Academy. Come enjoy games on Daffodil Hill, and work up an appetite for our array of specialty samplers and vendors of food, beer, and wine while our exciting lineup of Americana bands fills the air with music. For those who want the full VIP experience, special tickets are available for a live cooking demonstration by Mario Batali and his co-host from ABC’s The Chew, Carla Hall! Those who purchase tickets to Sunday’s Family Garden Picnic may even access a booksigning with Carla Hall or an exclusive reception hosted by Mario Batali—all to support NYBG’s children’s education hub, the Edible Academy.

Your All-Garden Pass grants you access to the Harvest Festival, as well as the recently opened Haunted Pumpkin Garden. Let your kids get into the Halloween spirit with a wide variety of activities in the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden—including Creepy Critters of Halloween, an entertaining and educational experience featuring live reptiles. The next two days offer many ways to enjoy fall at NYBG, during this warm and sunny weekend. Click through to check out the full schedule for the Harvest Festival, The Haunted Pumpkin Garden, our special tours, and more!


Saturday, September 27

Native Plant Garden

Bird Walk – 11 a.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
The diverse habitats of the Botanical Garden offer visitors a chance to see dozens of species of birds throughout the year. Bring your binoculars and walk the Garden grounds with an expert to learn about bird-friendly habitats, migrating species, and birds that make a permanent home at the Garden.

Harvest Festival – 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
At Daffodil Hill
Bring the whole family to celebrate the harvest. Participate in wine and beer talks and sample treats from our partners. Craft beer will be available also for sample and purchase. Activities include Pollinator Pals explorations and Edible Academy Tours in the Family Garden, a display of Garden tractors and equipment, and live music. Festival Ticket required.

Live Music
At the base of Daffodil Hill
Critically acclaimed Americana bands such as Spuyten Duyvil, Miss Tess and the Talkbacks, and the Minivans take the stage for a weekend of lively music on Daffodil Hill. Enjoy a relaxing listen, or get into the spirit with square dancing from 11 a.m. to 11:45 p.m.!

11 a.m.–11:45 a.m., Square Dance Lessons
12 p.m.–1:15 p.m., M Shanghai
1:30-2:45 p.m., Miles to Dayton
3–4:15 p.m., Miss Tess and the Talkbacks
4:15–5 p.m., DJ Music

Beer Wine Talks
Next to Clay Pavilions
Experts on wine and beer making, food pairings, and culinary skills invite you to join the conversation during presentations of their crafts.

11 a.m. Regal Vegan, Ella Nemcova
12 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyard
2 p.m. Chef William Creations
3 p.m. Brotherhood Winery

Harvest Market
At Clay Pavilions
The bounty of the harvest provides samplings from our many partner purveyors, brewers, and vintners. Picnic foods snacks and beverages, like beer, wine will be available for purchase from Steven STARR Events. Savory and sweet food trucks will round out the offerings and surely tempt more palettes!

Wine and Beer Samplers:

  • Adirondack Winery
  • Brotherhood Winery
  • City Winery
  • Artisan Wines Sonoma
  • La Cantina Wines Liquors
  • Casa Larga Winery
  • Sheldrake Point Winery
  • Crabbie’s Ginger Beer
  • Jonas Bronck’s Beer Company with The Bronx Beer Hall
  • Manhattan Beer Distributors
  • Fox Run Vineyards

Food Samplers:

  • Chef William Creations
  • Regal Vegan, Inc.
  • Sullivan Street Bakery
  • Tea-rrific! Ice Cream
  • Mike’s Deli
  • Lola Granola Bar
  • Hurd Orchards

Food Vendors:

  • STARR Food and Beer Stand
  • Bronx Baking Co.
  • Red Jacket Orchard
  • Bronx Beer Hall

Food Trucks:

  • Eddie’s Pizza
  • Yankee Doodle Dandy’s
  • Van Leeuwen Ice Cream

Display of Tractors and Garden Equipment
Along Crabapple Path
Get to see up close the tractors, mowers, and other machinery that the Garden uses to move mountains of dirt, plant trees, and create the landscape that you see before you.

Other Activities:

  • Games: Lawn Darts, Ladder Toss, Bean Bag Toss, Putting Greens
  • Haunted Pumpkin Garden Photo Ops
  • Cooking Demonstrations for Families at 2 4 p.m.
    In the Family Garden at the Whole Foods Market Family Garden Kitchen
  • Edible Academy Tours, 2, 3, 4, 5 p.m.
    In the Family Garden

Creepy Creatures of Halloween – 12 2 p.m.
Part of The Haunted Pumpkin Garden
At the Clay Family Picnic Pavilions
Some of the animals that make us scream are actually the coolest animals around. Meet some new critters from our big backyard and beyond during this live presentation and discover the unique adaptations that help them survive in their habitats.

A selection of featured creatures (may vary each weekend) includes:

  • Native NYBG reptiles (such as our snapping turtles!)
  • Dwarf Caiman
  • Large Albino Python or Boa Constrictor
  • Tegu Lizards
  • Small snakes
  • Sulcatta Tortoise
  • Panther Chameleon

About the presenting organization:
New York Wild! was created to give urban NYC residents more opportunities to experience nature up close. Erik Zeidler, founder of New York Wild!, has a lifelong passion for wildlife and nature, especially reptiles. This is an interest he has been pursuing since he was four years old while growing up in the Bronx, a seemingly unlikely setting for a naturalist. His company brings opportunities to the youth of New York City so that they too can be involved with wildlife. His programs have a profound impact and have changed the way many people feel about snakes and other misunderstood animals.

Garden Highlights Tour – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Sights and scents flourish across the 250 acres of the Botanical Garden. Join a Garden Guide for a walking tour featuring highlights of the gardens and plant collections

Azalea Garden Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Join us for a guided tour of the 11-acre site that offers an encyclopedic collection of the world’s azaleas planted along a broad hillside punctuated by rock outcrops and shaded by mature native trees.

Rock Garden Tour – 4 p.m.
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
The Rock Garden is a 2.5-acre oasis complete with a pond and waterfall and featuring alpine plants from six continents. Join an expertly trained Garden Guide for a walking tour to see and learn more about these jewel-like plants.


Sunday, September 28

Thain Family Forest

Harvest Festival – 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
At Daffodil Hill
Bring the whole family to celebrate the harvest. Participate in wine and beer talks and sample treats from our partners. Craft beer will be available also for sample and purchase. Activities include Pollinator Pals explorations and Edible Academy Tours in the Family Garden, a display of Garden tractors and equipment, and live music. Festival Ticket required.

Live Music
At the base of Daffodil Hill
Critically acclaimed Americana bands such as Spuyten Duyvil, Miss Tess and the Talkbacks, and the Minivans take the stage for a weekend of lively music on Daffodil Hill. Enjoy a relaxing listen, or get into the spirit with square dancing from 11 a.m. to 11:45 p.m.!

11 a.m.–11:45 a.m., Square Dance Lessons
12 p.m.–1:15 p.m. The Minivans
1:30-2:45 p.m. Roosevelt Dime
3–4:15 p.m. Spuyten Duyvil
4:15–5 p.m. DJ Music

Beer Wine Talks
Next to Clay Pavilions
Experts on wine and beer making, food pairings, and culinary skills invite you to join the conversation during presentations of their crafts.

11 a.m. Chef William Creations
12 p.m. Jonas Bronck’s Beer, Ken Hettinger
3 p.m. Sheldrake Point Winery, Tyler Tauck

Harvest Market
At Clay Pavilions
The bounty of the harvest provides samplings from our many partner purveyors, brewers, and vintners. Picnic foods snacks and beverages, like beer, wine will be available for purchase from Steven STARR Events. Savory and sweet food trucks will round out the offerings and surely tempt more palettes!

Wine and Beer Samplers:

  • Adirondack Winery
  • Brotherhood Winery
  • City Winery
  • Artisan Wines Sonoma
  • La Cantina Wines Liquors
  • Casa Larga Winery
  • Sheldrake Point Winery
  • Crabbie’s Ginger Beer
  • Jonas Bronck’s Beer Company with The Bronx Beer Hall
  • Manhattan Beer Distributors
  • Fox Run Vineyards

Food Samplers:

  • Chef William Creations
  • Regal Vegan, Inc.
  • Sullivan Street Bakery
  • Tea-rrific! Ice Cream
  • Mike’s Deli
  • Lola Granola Bar
  • Hurd Orchards

Food Vendors:

  • STARR Food and Beer Stand
  • Bronx Baking Co.
  • Red Jacket Orchard
  • Bronx Beer Hall

Food Trucks:

  • Eddie’s Pizza
  • Yankee Doodle Dandy’s
  • Crif Dogs
  • Van Leeuwen Ice Cream

Display of Tractors and Garden Equipment
Along Crabapple Path
Get to see up close the tractors, mowers, and other machinery that the Garden uses to move mountains of dirt, plant trees, and create the landscape that you see before you.

Other Activities:

  • Games: Lawn Darts, Ladder Toss, Bean Bag Toss, Putting Greens
  • Haunted Pumpkin Garden Photo Ops
  • Cooking Demonstrations for Families at 2 4 p.m.
    In the Family Garden at the Whole Foods Market Family Garden Kitchen
  • Edible Academy Tours, 2, 3, 4, 5 p.m.
    In the Family Garden

Creepy Creatures of Halloween – 12 2 p.m.
Part of The Haunted Pumpkin Garden
At the Clay Family Picnic Pavilions
Some of the animals that make us scream are actually the coolest animals around. Meet some new critters from our big backyard and beyond during this live presentation and discover the unique adaptations that help them survive in their habitats.

A selection of featured creatures (may vary each weekend) includes:

  • Native NYBG reptiles (such as our snapping turtles!)
  • Dwarf Caiman
  • Large Albino Python or Boa Constrictor
  • Tegu Lizards
  • Small snakes
  • Sulcatta Tortoise
  • Panther Chameleon

About the presenting organization:
New York Wild! was created to give urban NYC residents more opportunities to experience nature up close. Erik Zeidler, founder of New York Wild!, has a lifelong passion for wildlife and nature, especially reptiles. This is an interest he has been pursuing since he was four years old while growing up in the Bronx, a seemingly unlikely setting for a naturalist. His company brings opportunities to the youth of New York City so that they too can be involved with wildlife. His programs have a profound impact and have changed the way many people feel about snakes and other misunderstood animals.

Conservatory Tour – 12:30 p.m.
Meet at the entrance to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory
Explore the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, an acre of plants under glass, with one of the Garden’s Guides. Take an ecotour around the world through 11 distinct habitats, including two types of rain forest, deserts of the Americas and of Africa, and aquatic and carnivorous plant displays.

Cooking Demonstration with Mario Batali and Carla Hall–2 p.m.
In the Conservatory Tent
Enjoy a cooking demonstration by Chef Mario Batali and his co-host from ABC’s The Chew, Carla Hall. Special Ticket required. Seating is limited; advance purchase highly recommended.

Rose Garden Tour – 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden.
Immerse yourself in the fragrance, color, and beauty of the award-winning Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden on a tour with a Garden Tour Guide. Learn the differences between Heritage and Modern roses and between floribundas and hybrid teas as well as facts about rose history, cultivation, and folklore.


Ongoing Children’s Programs

New England aster Home Gardening Center

Family Adventures: The Haunted Pumpkin Garden – 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
In the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden
The Haunted Pumpkin Garden returns to its roots with a massive display of pumpkins and gourds from North America, ranging from the unusual to the gargantuan. Thousands of specimens will create a unique and fascinating backdrop to the slate of Halloween activities in the Everett Children’s Adventure Garden. Every day kids can play inside the Pumpkin House, put on a scary show at the Pumpkin Puppet Theater, look for wiggly worms under a rotting log, and plant a pumpkin seed to take home, while each weekend offers parades and even more treats.

  • Put on your own performance in the Pumpkin Puppet Theater
  • Play inside the Pumpkin House
  • Watch a pumpkin seed sprout
  • Go on a scavenger hunt
  • Join a Halloween Parade at 1 or 3 p.m. (on weekends, and including October 13 and 31)

Dig, Plant, Grow: Pollinator Palls: Bees and Butterflies
In the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden
The Family Garden is buzzing in late summer! Join us to learn about important pollinators: our honeybees and the monarch butterflies passing us by on their way to Mexico.

Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens – 2–6 p.m.
Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden
Kids can explore with Mario’s Menu Mystery game, featuring favorite vegetables and herbs from nine of his restaurants’ kitchens, including Otto and Del Posto.

Cooking Demonstrations – 2 4 p.m.
At the Whole Foods Market® Family Garden Kitchen
From late spring into early fall, learn to cook up flavorful new recipes using garden-fresh ingredients, twice a day on Wednesdays and weekends in the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden.
Sponsored by Whole Foods Market and Viking

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/09/garden-programming/this-weekend-fall-fun-at-the-harvest-festival/

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Gentle Giants in the Garden

Sonia Uyterhoeven is NYBG‘s Gardener for Public Education.


colocasia esculenta electric blue gecko

Colocasia esculenta ‘Electric Blue Gecko’

This year we have planted a number of varieties of elephant’s ear or taro (Colocasia esculenta) in the Home Gardening Center. Colocasia is sometimes confused with Alocasia macrorrhiza, which is also known as elephant’s ear or giant taro, but the two are quite easy to distinguish.

They both have massive foliage that looks—as the name suggests—like an elephant’s ear. The most identifiable difference between the two genera is that the foliage on Alocasia points upwards like an arrowhead, while the foliage on Colocasia points downwards to form the shape of a heart.

Earlier this year, I wrote about one of the Colocasia in the Trial Beds in the Home Gardening Center—C. ‘Electric Blue Gekko’. Now that the season has progressed, it is easier to make an assessment of the different varieties grown and to pick out favorites.

One variety that I liked from the start is Colocasia esculenta ‘Illustris’. It is a fine specimen that lives up to its grand name. It is one of the showier cultivars that we have growing—with green foliage that has large purple-black markings spread between its large green veins. It has an otherworldly, almost prehistoric appeal to it. It also looks like a talented artist tie-dyed its leaves. If you are looking for a high impact tropical plant for your summer border, this is it.

I am drawn to the dark, and another favorite taro in the garden this year was Colocasia ‘Diamond Head’. It grows 4 feet tall and produces a dense display of lightly ruffled, glossy, chocolate-black leaves. The foliage is massive, the color deep and luscious, but it is the glossy shine that really makes it stand out. We have it arching over a variegated cassava (Manihot esculenta ‘Variegata’). The cassava has large, palmately lobed, bright green leaves that are variegated with a creamy yellow along the midribs. The contrast between the two plants is striking.

elephant's ear Colocasia esculenta 'Diamond Head' taro dasheen

Colocasia esculenta ‘Diamond Head’

If you are looking for contrast but want something that is slightly more subdued, you should consider the black stem elephant’s ear (Colocasia ‘Fontanesii’). Unlike the dense habit of ‘Diamond Head’ it has a graceful, arching demeanor. It has a pitch black stem and large, dark green leaves that often take on the purple-burgundy hues of the sturdy, striking stems. This elephant’s ear likes to grow tall and can reach up to 6 feet tall if it is well fed. In our garden it stretches past 5 feet.

If you need something large and bright to lighten up your annual borders, or to add as an exotic touch to your mixed perennial border, then I would recommend Colocasia ‘Lemonade’. It reaches just over 4 feet tall and has lovely chartreuse foliage that is bright and cheery without being overwhelming. It has a tendency to spread along short, above-ground rhizomes, so give it a little space to fill out and do its thing.

As far as Colocasia culture is concerned, the most important thing to remember is that these elephant’s ear like full sun unless they are grown in very hot climates, and they love water and nutrients. The more you feed it, the larger it will grow. You can situate it by the damp edge of a pond and it will thrive. It does superbly in average garden soil or in a large container as long as you remember to keep it well-watered during the heat of the summer.

colocasia esculenta home gardening center

Colocasia esculenta in the Home Gardening Center

When you plant the corms in the late summer, place them at a depth of 2 to 4 inches below soil. They can be started earlier indoors in a pot and brought out for a late spring planting. The majority of elephant’s ear that you will find on the market are hardy to zone 7b. A few, such as Colocasia ‘Pink China’, are supposed to be hardy to zone 6. If you intend to leave any of your taros outside over the winter, make sure you pile a foot of shredded leaf mulch over the corm to give it added protection.

Most of your elephant’s ear or taros will need to be lifted in the winter. You can store the large corms in peat moss over winter in a dry, cool location that stays above freezing. Make sure that the corm is able to breathe—an airtight container will trap moisture and cause it to rot. All in all, they are a hassle-free tropical that will add impact to your garden—they are definitely worth a try.


Learn more about Colocasia in Curator’s Spotlight.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/09/tip-of-the-week/gentle-giants-in-the-garden/

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Morning Eye Candy: A Peaceful Moment

While there the daffodils have left for the year, Daffodil Hill is just as beautiful in the fall. That is why we will host several Harvest Festival activities on these sunny slopes! Come picnic at the Harvest Market and admire the show of tractors and garden equipment this weekend.

Daffodil Hill
At Daffodil Hill – Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/09/photography/morning-eye-candy-a-peaceful-moment/

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This Week at the Greenmarket: Teeny Tiny Tomatoes

Epicurious Fall Salad Recipe

Photo via Epicurious

Wednesday is Greenmarket day at NYBG, until 3 p.m. Our local vendors are back today with fresh fruits and vegetables, including many varieties of cherry and grape tomatoes! A little sweet, a little tart, and always refreshing, we tend to think of these little morsels as a summer staple. With October right around the corner, we found a recipe to share with you that explores their potential uses in autumn recipes.

Click through for how to prepare Fall Salad with Corn, Cherry Tomatoes, and Oven-Roasted Green Onions. There are many other goods available today, including fresh flowers, lettuce, herbs, scallions, acorn squash, hot peppers, eggplant, sweet potatoes, plums, peaches, green grapes, and seasonal pumpkin baked goods. Plan your visit to the Greenmarket by checking out what’s in season. The Greenmarket accepts food stamps, EBT, WIC/FMNP, and Senior coupons, in addition to cash and credit or debit cards.

NYBG Greenmarket tomatoesFall Salad of Corn, Cherry Tomatoes, and Oven-Roasted Green Onions

Via Epicurious

Ingredients

  1. 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  2. 1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
  3. 1 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  4. 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
  5. 1 cup olive oil
  6. 6 tablespoons sour cream
  7. 18 green onions
  8. 6 cups fresh corn kernels
  9. 3 cups halved cherry tomatoes

Preparation

  1. Combine first 4 ingredients in processor. With machine running, gradually add 3/4 cup oil. Transfer mixture to medium bowl. Whisk in sour cream. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper.
  2. Preheat oven to 450°F. Place onions on rimmed baking sheet. Brush with remaining 1/4 cup oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast until beginning to brown, about 10 minutes. Cool. Cut into 1-inch pieces. Transfer to large bowl.
  3. Cook corn in large pot of boiling salted water until crisp-tender, about 4 minutes. Drain; add to onions. (Dressing and onion-corn mixture can be made 1 day ahead. Cover separately; chill.) Add tomatoes and dressing to onion-corn mixture and toss. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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Article source: http://blogs.nybg.org/plant-talk/2014/09/garden-programming/this-week-at-the-greenmarket-teeny-tiny-tomatoes/

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